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Thread: fiberglass ladder treatment?

  1. #1
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    fiberglass ladder treatment?

    Is there any way to treat fiberglass ladders that are beginning to release their fibers? I have a few ladders that spend their lives on the ladder rack baking in the sun and they are starting to raise little tiny fibers that are annoying as all get out when you happen to encounter them. Besides that the ladders are in good shape so I was hoping that there was some kind of spray dope or something that would help extend their service. Or is this a sign that they are ready to be retired?
    "If you don't do it this year , you'll be one year older when you do" Warren Miller

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ishium 80439
    Is there any way to treat fiberglass ladders that are beginning to release their fibers? I have a few ladders that spend their lives on the ladder rack baking in the sun and they are starting to raise little tiny fibers that are annoying as all get out when you happen to encounter them. Besides that the ladders are in good shape so I was hoping that there was some kind of spray dope or something that would help extend their service. Or is this a sign that they are ready to be retired?
    Go to a marine or boat shop and look for topcoat(?) for fiberglass resin with UV retardant in it.

  3. #3
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    sounds like a great idea

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sierrasparky
    sounds like a great idea
    We do that sometimes.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  5. #5
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    Illinois
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    Some recommendations from one ladder manufacturer.
    RECOMMENDED METHOD OF PREPARATION
    1. Sand the rails of the ladder smooth with a nonmetallic abrasive such as
    Scotchbrite®. Do not use ordinary sandpaper or emery cloth as it will leave a
    trace of abrasive grit embedded in the rail surface and may cause the surface to
    be an electrical conductor.
    2. Wash the entire rail surface clean with denatured alcohol or an equivalent
    acceptable for health reasons and allow to air dry. Wash down a second time to
    ensure that no residue is left on the surface of the ladder.
    3. Use a primer followed by one or two coats of either acrylic lacquer or
    polyurethane paint with U.V. additives for coating purposes. It is important to
    coat the sawed ends of the rails whenever possible. To restore color, apply a
    pigmented acrylic lacquer or polyurethane paint. Pigmented coating will screen
    out an even greater amount of U.V. while restricting moisture entry.
    Several acceptable coatings are on page five.
    4. Contact Werner Co. for replacement labels.
    3. Ladders stored out-of-doors for extended periods of time can have the effect of
    weathering decreased by semi-annual waxing of the rails. Normally a good
    commercial non-slip paste wax, such as Trewax3, clear paste wax, will reduce
    the possibility of glass fiber prominence.
    4. Ladders employed in geographic locales with high U.V. ray exposure can have
    extended life and reduced potential for glass fiber prominence by periodic coating
    with certain acrylic lacquers, polyurethane coatings or similar materials. The
    U.V. additive employed in the resin formulation is gradually consumed during
    sunlight exposure. These subsequent coatings replace the U.V. screen or barrier.
    5. A spot coating with a highly pigmented polyurethane resin is highly recommended
    when the ladder surface has been damaged by localized impact or abrasion. If
    there is any structural damage consult Werner Co. on repair or replacement
    or discard the ladder.
    6. Ladders in service out-of-doors, where high humidity or high humidity coupled
    with intense U.V. ray exposure exists, may have their service life increased by
    applying a lacquer or paint coating and waxing.
    You can read the complete document here.
    Don, Illinois
    "It is the first responsibility of every citizen to question authority." B Franklin

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Maryland
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    I know the cable company here brings a vendor in to do the ladder recoating on an annual basis.

    I will try and find out more.

  7. #7
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    I run into the same problem with my fishsticks some people who dont know how to use them and or didnt pay for them bend them too much and this releases the fibers when overbent. Then along comes an unsusspecting jerk like me who gets fibers stuck in thier fingers for a week very painfull I should use a good quality glove when using them but I never want to take the time to get them.
    The tail does NOT wag the dog.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by quogueelectric
    I run into the same problem with my fishsticks some people who dont know how to use them and or didnt pay for them bend them too much and this releases the fibers when overbent. Then along comes an unsusspecting jerk like me who gets fibers stuck in thier fingers for a week very painfull I should use a good quality glove when using them but I never want to take the time to get them.
    this is a serious issue actually most people don't respect the slivers you can get from fiberglass and they can be serious to have removed..just think what would happen if one got lodged in your eye..new equipement is cheap then..so if you have employees you need to weight the cost of medical and lost time..thanks for the info on the resurfacing of the ladders..
    Life is temporary, heaven is forever. live life like it is your only chance to make a difference..

    to do nothing is the surest way to achieve nothing..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by quogueelectric
    I run into the same problem with my fishsticks some people who dont know how to use them and or didnt pay for them bend them too much and this releases the fibers when overbent. Then along comes an unsusspecting jerk like me who gets fibers stuck in thier fingers for a week very painfull I should use a good quality glove when using them but I never want to take the time to get them.
    Fishsticks??
    It's my name going on that drawing, not yours. If what you want ain't right, it ain't going on the drawings!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    813
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragin Cajun
    Fishsticks??
    http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/1ED74

    Don't leave home without them.
    Chris Knight
    Syracuse NY

    Quando omni flunkus moritati

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