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Thread: Electric Baseboard Heat

  1. #1
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    Electric Baseboard Heat

    Is their a rule of thumb for btu's per sq. ft. for apartment electric baseboard heat? Ex. 1 bedroom apt. aprox 675 sq. ft.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Is their a rule of thumb for btu's per sq. ft. for apartment electric baseboard heat? Ex. 1 bedroom apt. aprox 675 sq. ft.
    I used to figure 12 watts per square foot, so a 675 sq. ft. apartment would require 8,100 watts divided by 250 watts per lineal foot of baseboard heat (check with manufacturer's listing) would work out to 34 feet of heat. I never used to put more than 14 feet of heat on a circuit.

    Many electricians use 10 watts per sq. ft. Some even use 15 watts per sq. ft. depending of amount and quality of insulation.:smile:
    Answers based on the 2008 NEC Edition when I think to grab that one.

    What you are, you are by accident of birth; what I am, I am by myself. There are and will be a thousand princes; there is only one Beethoven. Ludwig van Beethoven



  3. #3
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    I have always used 10 watts per square foot. Never had any problems.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len View Post
    Is their a rule of thumb for btu's per sq. ft. for apartment electric baseboard heat? Ex. 1 bedroom apt. aprox 675 sq. ft.
    It will vary depending on where you live and how well insulated the house is.

  5. #5
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    Since ceiling heights vary, I use 1 watt per cubic foot.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdshunk View Post
    Since ceiling heights vary, I use 1 watt per cubic foot.
    Do you apply any adjustment factors to that for things like leaky windows, uninsulated walls, etc?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter d View Post
    Do you apply any adjustment factors to that for things like leaky windows, uninsulated walls, etc?
    No. Reason being is that this rule of thumb works in the worst case scenario. There is no penalty for short cycling of a baseboard heater. Doing a Manual J on the worst case and the average case will often yield the same heater or heaters anyhow. I use the Honeywell Line Volt Pro thermostats exclusively now. It will maintain the heat within 3/10ths of a degree. It "pulses" the heat when it starts to get close to set point, and can predicatively start pulsing the heat when it thinks it's ready for more heat. The #1 complaint about electric baseboard is the differential that all mechanical stats provide. The Honeywell Line Volt Pro makes having electric baseboard really nice.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdshunk View Post
    Since ceiling heights vary, I use 1 watt per cubic foot.
    I like this method, makes more sense than per square foot. If you are trying to fill a three dimensional container (with heated air), not a two dimensional container, why not use three dimensional measurements?
    " That's all I have to say about that! " ~ Forest Gump

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdshunk View Post
    The Honeywell Line Volt Pro makes having electric baseboard really nice.
    Looks like an Aube product that got folded into Honeywell's line when they took over Aube.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter d View Post
    Looks like an Aube product that got folded into Honeywell's line when they took over Aube.
    Yes, but it's the best line voltage heating stat I've ever used. Now, it's the only one I'll use when I have any say. In much the same way that I think motion sensors are a sure-fire callback (so I only use RAB motion sensors to prevent that), line voltage stats have been a constant source of callbacks. The Honeywell Line Volt pro solves the callback problem.

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