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Thread: Liquid Tight vs. Sealtite

  1. #1
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    Liquid Tight vs. Sealtite

    Are they the same? If not, what are the differences?

    Thanks.
    c

  2. #2
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    In my world they're the two terms are interchangeable. Sealtite is a brand name.
    Rob

    Chief Moderator

    All responses based on the 2011 NEC unless otherwise noted

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    In my world they're the two terms are interchangeable. Sealtite is a brand name.
    I agree. Also, in industrial settings where "Greenfield" is rarely used, I've heard Sealtite called "flex".

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvirgil467 View Post
    Are they the same? If not, what are the differences?

    Thanks.
    c
    Look at NEC Article 350 for LFMC and Article 356 for LFNC. Do you have an NEC? Agreed sealtite is simply a brand name and should be covered under LFNC.
    Last edited by dcspector; 04-05-09 at 09:21 AM.
    Greg

    Electrical Inspector in our Nations Capital

  5. #5
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    Sealtite is a company name. We use the term for liquid tight flexible metal conduit. Others use it for non-metallic liquid tight conduit. On the last job I did all the FMC came from Sealtite and the boxes the small rolls came in had the Sealtite logo on the box. In fact, I don't even see the product we call Sealtite on the company's web site:

    http://www.anacondasealtite.com/products.htm

    When working in different areas it's best to stick with the NEC terms until you become familiar with the local electrical slang.

    Another example is 'flex'. In this area the term refers to MC cable. 40 miles from here the term refers to flexible metal conduit.

    How many of you have used a Chicago bender? If it was a Greenlee it was simply a Chicago 'style' bender. I own two real Chicago benders and have copies of the patents for them. They are red and black and are made by a company named Lidseen, after the inventor Gustave Lidseen. BTW, the real Chicago bender was 77 years old on April 2nd of this (2009) year.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvirgil467 View Post
    Are they the same? If not, what are the differences?

    Thanks.
    c
    It is exactly the same as one referring to in-line skates as Roller Blades, a pair of side cutters as Kleins, "an Americans best interest" as "the government"...........

    I am totally joking about the last one!:grin:

  7. #7
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    In my area, "sealtight" is LFMC, and "carflex" is LFNC. Using the term "liquidtight" prompts the question, "Metallic or nonmetallic?"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Stolz View Post
    In my area, "sealtight" is LFMC, and "carflex" is LFNC. Using the term "liquidtight" prompts the question, "Metallic or nonmetallic?"
    That's how we look at the terminology in my area as well.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Stolz View Post
    In my area, "sealtight" is LFMC, and "carflex" is LFNC. Using the term "liquidtight" prompts the question, "Metallic or nonmetallic?"
    I'll third that. And flex refers to FMC.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryFine View Post
    I'll third that. And flex refers to FMC.
    I'll fourth that. I've heard the term "greenfield" used a few times, but mostly "flex" is FMC.

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