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Thread: Arc-Fault

  1. #1
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    Arc-Fault

    210.12B Arc-Fault breakers are required for dining room receptacles but not for kitchen receptacles. However according to 210.52B(1) Dining room receptacles are required to be served from the small appliance branch circuits. So in order to meet this requirement and stay competitive:mad:I would need to run a separate 20a, arc-fault protected branch circuit to the dining room receptacles, is that correct? :-?My local jurisdiction just adopted 2008 NEC Jan 1.

  2. #2
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    You can come off the SA circuits but you do not have to. Pull seperate dining room circuits and rock on..
    If you dont your kitchen outlets will be arc and gfi which is legal also.
    Last edited by jwjrw; 02-06-10 at 06:10 PM.
    The more I learn the less I seem to know....

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mclassen View Post
    210.12B Arc-Fault breakers are required for dining room receptacles but not for kitchen receptacles. However according to 210.52B(1) Dining room receptacles are required to be served from the small appliance branch circuits. So in order to meet this requirement and stay competitive:mad:I would need to run a separate 20a, arc-fault protected branch circuit to the dining room receptacles, is that correct? :-?My local jurisdiction just adopted 2008 NEC Jan 1.
    Welcome to 2008. IMO the outlets in a dinning room that are feed from the sabc's are not requried to be AFCI'ed. But any other circ. in the dinning room would be requried to be AFCI'ed. Such as lighting or any other outlets that did not originate from the sabc's.
    Organized people are people that are just too lazy to look for their stuff

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceb58 View Post
    Welcome to 2008. IMO the outlets in a dinning room that are feed from the sabc's are not requried to be AFCI'ed. But any other circ. in the dinning room would be requried to be AFCI'ed. Such as lighting or any other outlets that did not originate from the sabc's.
    210.12B ALL circuits supplying outlets in .....dining rooms....????

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceb58 View Post
    Welcome to 2008. IMO the outlets in a dinning room that are feed from the sabc's are not requried to be AFCI'ed. But any other circ. in the dinning room would be requried to be AFCI'ed. Such as lighting or any other outlets that did not originate from the sabc's.

    210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.

    (B) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter, combination-type, installed to provide protection of the branch circuit.

    Whether or not it's fed from an SABC or not, it's required to AFCId. No exceptions.

  6. #6
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    Whats funny too, is it calls for "combination" arc fault breakers, I'm doing a remodel in the city of Atlanta, so I knew this would be strictly enforced. I ordered combination Arc fault breakers, and the supply house sent regular old style Arc fault breakers. Called our inside rep, and he did not even know they made a combination Arc fault breaker, or even what it was. Had to go down to the orange box to get them. Thats a sad statement on supply houses.

  7. #7
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    One more question regarding SABC. Can I put the microwave/Hood combo receptacle on one of the SABC? Microwave/Hood combos are permanently mounted above a range or cooktop and are cord & plug connected to a receptacle in the upper cabinet. I have always believed this was a violation but 210.52B3 makes me wonder. I guess the disposer/diswasher receptacle would fall in this same category :confused:

  8. #8
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    most BI I've seen require a seperate BC per mfg instructions.
    Charlie

  9. #9
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    I think it's possible to have a branch circuit with an AFCI circuit breaker and GFCI receptacles. However GFCI's are only required for all 15A and 20A, 125 volt receptacles that serve countertop surfaces that would be found in a kitchen and not in a dining room.
    Last edited by erickench; 02-06-10 at 11:15 PM.
    Eric Kench, P.E.


    If it's not broken don't fix it

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by erickench View Post
    I think it's possible to have a branch circuit with an AFCI circuit breaker and GFCI receptacles.
    Not only possible, but commonly done.

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