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Thread: New for the 2011

  1. #1
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    New for the 2011

    Those of you that know me well know that the fall of every three years is a very busy time for me, and that explains why you haven't seen me in quite some time. I would like to share with you a few of the Code changes that are upcoming in the 2011 NEC, from a book that I am editing currently. I hope you find this information useful:

    New for the 2011 NEC®
    The 2011 has some notable changes, many of which are quite significant. Some these more major changes are noted here.

    What's new for the 2011 NEC®
    During the 2011 NEC development process, several thousand changes and public comments were considered.
    Fine Print Notes are now referred to as "Informational Notes." The term “fine print” does not describe the function of a sentence or provision, it simply refers to the size of the text. By changing the term to “informational note,” the Code makes it quite clear that these notes are intended to provide information and nothing else. The same logic applies to the change to “informative annexes.” The style and layout of these notes and annexes have not changed, nor has the intent of them.
    A new Article 694 for small wind electric systems has been added. This article covers small wind (turbine) electrical systems up to and including 100 kW. These systems can contain generators, alternators, inverters, and controllers.
    A new Article 840 has also been added, which covers Premises-Powered Broadband Communications Systems. This article is similar to Article 830, but is often times more applicable. Expect for rare instances, Article 830 installations are made by a communications utility. Article 840 is intended to apply more regularly.


    Only a few changes occurred in Article90. 90.2(B)(5) was revised to fix an error that occurred in 2008. This mistake was the removal of utility installations on Native American reservations, federal lands and similar areas from Code exemption. This change now gives the AHJ a means to exempt utility wiring in these areas.
    Chapter 1--General

    The definition of Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI) has been relocated from 210.12 to Article 100 because the term is used in more than one Article.
    The definition of "bathroom" has been revised to add urinals, bidets, and similar equipment to the list of items that may be found in a bathroom. This change will result in a more uniform understanding of the Code.
    "Bonding Jumper" is now referred to as "Bonding Conductor or Jumper." The 2008 (and previous editions) referred only to “bonding jumpers,” which seems to imply a very short length of conductor used to bond things together. Although this may often be the case, they also may be much longer.

    The term "grounding conductor" has been removed from the Code in not only Article 100, but also all other articles of the Code. The definition of "grounding conductor" seemed to apply only to communications systems and auxiliary grounding electrodes, yet this term was often used where "grounding electrode conductor" should have been used. Changes to the Code this cycle make for a more consistent and technically accurate document.
    All "service Conductor" related definitions have been revised, deleted, or added. A real effort has been made to clarify that service conductors are those that are downstream of the "service point". Conductors upstream of the service point are not service conductors, they are utility conductors (and are not covered by the Code).
    110.3(A)(1) Has been changed to reflect the fact some pieces of electrical equipment have special requirements, such as limitations on elevation, ambient temperature correction, power quality requirements or specific types of overcurrent devices. This information may be marked on equipment, or it may be in the product literature, or listing and labeling information.
    Changes to 110.10 clarify that, in addition to the impedance of the circuit, the short-circuit current ratings of equipment are a vital part of determining whether or not a system or circuit can withstand the effects of a short circuit or ground fault. Specific examples of the types of things that warrant consideration are always better than referring to “other characteristics.”

    New provisions for finely stranded conductors have been added to 110.14, recognizing the fact that these conductors warrant special consideration.
    A substantial change was made to Article 110 with the addition of 110.24. This new section requires that the available fault current must be marked at the service equipment of all installations, other than dwelling units. This change is intended to make sections 110.9 and 110.10 easier for the EHJ to validate.
    The location of Table 110.28 (formerly 110.20) has been changed to Part II of the article, so that it applies only to equipment operating at 600 volts or less.

    Chapter 2--Wiring and Protection

    200.4 has been added to the Code, and it prohibits a single neutral conductor from serving multiple circuits (not including multiwire branch circuits). Nothing in previous editions of the Code prohibited a properly size neutral conductor from serving multiple circuits with ungrounded conductors of the same phase. This change eliminates this oddity from the Code.
    As has been the case for the last several Code cycles, 210.8, covering GFCI protection, has been revised. The test and reset functions of the GFCI device must now be in a readily accessible location so that they can be tested monthly, as required by the product standard. A revision was made to the requirements of GFCI protected receptacles in patient care areas, and a new requirement for GFCI protection in nondwelling unit indoor wet locations has been added. Nondwelling locker rooms with associated showering facilities also require GFCI protection now, as do all 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles installed in service bays, garages and similar areas. The areas in which this applies is wherever electrical diagnostic equipment, electrical hand tools, or portable lighting equipment are to be used.
    Clarifications to the AFCI requirements have been made, especially as it pertains to branch circuit extensions and modifications.
    Changes to Part II of Article 225 will help Code users to understand the applicability of the requirements, and changes throughout Article 230 will help to delineate the difference between which conductors the Code covers and which conductors the Code doesn't cover.
    A new term: "Bonding Jumper, Supply-Side" has been added to the definitions in 250.2. It is a new term, and can be found throughout Article 250.
    Experienced Code users will recognize immediately that 250.30, covering separately derived systems, has been rewritten.
    Experienced Code users may find themselves clicking their heels when they see that 250.56 is gone, but they may also see their smiles turn to frowns when they see that it was only relocated to 250.53(A)(2).
    250.118 has been revised (again) to help to clarify the types of equipment grounding conductors (EGCs) recognized by the Code.
    Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City
    Inspector, Instructor

  2. #2
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    Chapter 3--Wiring Methods
    Chapter 3 has many significant changes. 300.4(E) has been revised to clarify the requirements for wiring near roof decks which were added in the 2008 NEC®, and a new subsection, 300.4(H), was added to address structural expansion and deflection joints.
    300.11(A)(2) has been revised to require all suspended ceiling wires supporting electrical equipment to marked and distinguishable from the other ceiling wires. This provision previously only applied when the ceiling was fire-resistance rated.
    300.22 has been extensively revised to provide consistency with the terms used in widely adopted mechanical codes, such as the International Mechanical Code.
    Article 310 has been extensively revised. The experienced Code user will recognize a complete renumbering of not only the sections, but the tables as well. The ampacity adjustment provisions have been clarified, the correction factors for raceways on rooftops have been made more stringent, and the ampacities of some conductors have been reduced!
    Changes to 312.8 now require a warning label on some cabinets, and the requirements for the weight ratings of boxes in 314.27 have been revised.
    Changes to Article 334, Type NM Cable, clarify the permitted uses of Type NM Cable in dwelling unit accessory buildings, and the ampacity adjustment requirements of 334.80 have been clarified.
    The controversial issue of unsupported raceways (added in the 2008 NEC) has been removed altogether, resulting in a different controversy now. Support requirements for Flexible Metal Conduit and Liquidtight Flexible Metal Conduit have been changed as well.
    Article 392 experienced a much needed face-lift this Code cycle. Changes to this article include a uses permitted and uses not permitted section, similar to the 3xx.10 and 3xx.12 sections found in other Articles of Chapter 3. The provisions for the grounding and bonding of cable tray systems have also been made clearer in 2011.
    Chapter 4--Equipment for General Use
    Significant changes to Chapter 4 can be found throughout the chapter, beginning in Article 404, Switches. 404.2(C) contains a very substantial change--one that has many electricians grumbling. With this changes, the days of two conductor switch loops and dead-end three way switches are in the past, except for raceway systems and some unfinished areas of buildings. This new requirement will mandate a grounded conductor at each switch location for line-to-neutral switch controlled loads.
    Another change in this article, this time to 404.9, will have some installers and many inspectors smiling. An allowance for certain switches to be installed without the benefit of an equipment grounding conductor has been made. These switch assemblies contain no metal parts, and can only be connected to nonmetallic cover plates, so safety is not compromised. Previously the AHJ was forced to use 90.4 and waive the requirement if this product was to be installed.
    As wiring systems become older, the Code has added provisions for updating systems, and this edition of the Code is no different. Replacement of AFCI protected circuits, tamper-resistant receptacles, and weather-resistant receptacles are all now addressed in the Code, and tamper-resistant receptacles are now required in guest rooms, guest suites, and child care facilities.
    Many revisions throughout Article 410 have been to address LED luminaires and their drivers.
    Perhaps the most controversial change in this edition can be found in Article 445, which covers generators. 445.20 now requires that all 125V receptacles that are part of a generator, 15 kW or smaller, must have GFCI protection.
    Last but certainly not least in Chapter 4, a new section 450.14 has been added, which requires a disconnecting means for transformers (other than Class 2 and Class 3 transformers). Although commonly thought to already be a requirement, it has never been found in the Code until now, and will require substantial consideration in the design of an electrical system.

    Chapter 5--Special Occupancies
    Listing requirements for different types of equipment in hazardous (classified) locations have been added for Class I, Class II, and Class III locations.
    Clarifications to the disconnect requirements for fuel dispensers can be found in 514.11 and 514.13, and the "redundant" equipment grounding provisions in 517.13 have also been clarified.
    Installers, and particularly designers, might be shocked to find that 517.16 now prohibits isolated ground receptacles from being used in patient care areas.
    The GFCI requirements for assembly occupancies (Article 518) and carnivals, circuses, fairs, and similar events have been clarified. And a new requirement for GFPE protection at marinas and boatyards should result in a much safer environment in these areas.

    Chapter 6--Special Equipment
    Article 645, covering information technology equipment and rooms, has been revised with new definitions, revised requirements, and new provisions.
    Article 680 has been changed to incorporate a new concept, that of the "low voltage contact limit." Perhaps most substantially in Article 680, the rules on equipotential bonding have been revised…again, and the bonding of hydromassage bathtubs has been expanded to provide for replacement motors.
    Because solar photovoltaic systems are such an expanding technology, it should come as no surprise that the article experienced an incredible amount of changes. One need only glance at the Code book to recognize this fact. Of particular interest to those involved in these systems, 690.47(D) has been deleted, removing the requirement for an additional grounding electrode for a ground or pole mounted PV array.
    As mentioned earlier, a new Article 694 covering small wind systems has been added, and there are some change in Article 695 for fire pumps, mostly having to do with the routing of fire pump circuitry.

    Chapter 7--Special Conditions
    Articles 701 and 702 have been reorganized in an effort to harmonize the numbering system for emergency systems, legally required standby systems, and optional standby systems. Article 725 and 760 saw little action in this Code revision cycle. 725.3 and 760.3 saw most of the changes, which inform the Code user about which Article 300 provisions apply to these installations.
    As is often the case, Article 770, covering optical fiber cables, saw extensive revisions, but most of them were editorial in nature. New to the 2011 NEC is the concept of "cable routing assemblies", a wiring trough for limited energy circuits. The definition for this system can be found in 770.2

    Chapter 8--Communications Systems
    Like the past few Code cycles, Chapter 8 saw a lot of revisions in 2011, most of which were editorial in nature. With the removal of the term "grounding conductor" from the Code, many changes to the text were made. Removal of the requirement of insulated grounding electrode conductors makes for consistency throughout the Chapter 8 articles, and new tables added to these articles should make for easier navigation through these articles.
    As discussed earlier in this book, a new Article 840 has been added, which covers premises-powered broadband communications systems.

    Chapter 9--Tables
    A new Table 10 has been added, which addresses finely stranded conductor. Most of the information in this table is borrowed from UL 486A-B, Table 14.
    Annexes A through I
    A new Annex, Annex I, has been added to provide tightening torques for terminations. This new annex consists of two tables, each of which is borrowed from UL 486A-B.
    I apologize for my notable absence, but I am sure that you understand.
    I am receiving author credit on Mike Holt's Code changes book this go-round, and I have also added other author's books on my editing resume. I do hope that this explains my notable absence, and I should very much like to say how much I have missed all of you this last year or so.
    Mike's book is in the final phases of the draft. I am going to be making my final changes/corrections/edits/additions this Saturday, after which it will go to the printer and be finalized. I take great pride in the fact that, if we wanted to, we could have published this book two months before the actual Code comes out.

    Regards,
    Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City
    Inspector, Instructor

  3. #3
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    Good job Ryan!

    You're a credit to inspectors.

  4. #4
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    Thanks mate!
    Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City
    Inspector, Instructor

  5. #5
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    Wink

    Installers, and particularly designers, might be shocked to find that 517.16 now prohibits isolated ground receptacles from being used in patient care areas.
    Gee, with 517.13 in place I never saw where 517.16 did allow it in patient care areas.

    Sorry for the thread jack.

    Roger
    Moderator

  6. #6
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    Well, if you look at the ROP, you will notice yours truly as the submitter of that one! Part of the problem is exactly what you state, there is no real way to comply with 517.13 anyway if you use an IG.
    Ryan Jackson, Salt Lake City
    Inspector, Instructor

  7. #7
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    Good information Ryan thanks.
    Steve

  8. #8
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    When will the 2011 actually be available for purchase?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan_618
    . . .beginning in Article 404, Switches. 404.2(C) contains a very substantial change--one that has many electricians grumbling. With this changes, the days of two conductor switch loops and dead-end three way switches are in the past, except for raceway systems and some unfinished areas of buildings. This new requirement will mandate a grounded conductor at each switch location for line-to-neutral switch controlled loads.
    Why?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan_618
    445.20 now requires that all 125V receptacles that are part of a generator, 15 kW or smaller, must have GFCI protection.
    When they say "part of", is that meaning built into the frame or housing of the actual generator or any generator supplied receptacle? If we install a smaller than 15kw genny on a building w/ loadshedding panel, are all receps within the building supplied by the generator required to have GFCI protection?
    Brought to you by Carl's Jr. ©

  10. #10
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    Good job Ryan. And now may I be the first here (in this thread I mean...) to publicly grumble about the 2011 change to 404.2 (C). This one does not make wiring one bit safer, we already are re-painting the white conductor so please nobody bring that to the table. The change only helps one of our competitor's out- the alarm/ low voltage guys who will be coming behind us in great numbers now to add fancier switches in than the ones they sell at Rexall. It will however play hell in many instances with box fill. So with that in mind, I am going on the attack. I hereby re-open my low voltage wiring division ( which as a c-13 license holder I am fully licensed to do by the way) and perpetrate many haphazard alarm and video monitoring jobs, screw up the industry with shoddy reputation,,, all in the name of revenge......
    85deg. an Sunny today.

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