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Thread: Grounding Fluorescent Light Ballast

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Grounding Fluorescent Light Ballast

    I was recently called to a job to fix the garage lights. The lights were fluorescent lights that needed the ballast and lamps replaced. The lighting circuit did not have an equipment ground due to the age of the house. All new ballast say that they must be grounded. Am I in violation to replace these ballast in these existing fixtures without grounding the fixture? Thank you, Trent

  2. #2
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    Nov 2004
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    Go HAWKS
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    I vote yes.
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  3. #3
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    Jan 2008
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    Raeford, NC
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    I would say yes also, if the instructions on the ballast say they must be grounded. 110.3 B
    Have heard of some of the new electronic ballast not firing the lamps if not grounded.
    Organized people are people that are just too lazy to look for their stuff

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Durham, NC
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    5,214
    I'll say yes as well, read through 410.40, 410.42, 410.44, and 410.46.

    I thought flourscent was required to have the EGC to be with-in 6" of the ballast, but I can't find that one...
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Ma
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    1,857
    [QUOTE=t-bird;1236237]I was recently called to a job to fix the garage lights. The lights were fluorescent lights that needed the ballast and lamps replaced. The lighting circuit did not have an equipment ground due to the age of the house. All new ballast say that they must be grounded. Am I in violation to replace these ballast in these existing fixtures without grounding the fixture? Thank you, Trent[/QUOTE

    Heres a good link.http://members.misty.com/don/f-lamp.html
    fluorescent lights and ballast work from a ECG for starting the ballast give the lamps a shot of high voltage at both ends the end are called cathodes that have murcury and the bulb has argon gas and other stuff .when you turn the lights the ends heat up and cause an arc ,and that arc wants to connect on both ends so the electrons travel along the grouned cover and that is how the arc jump across for the lamp to light
    . If the fixtures are not grouned there will allways be problems with starting and that gets worse the colder it gets.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ma
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    1,857
    also your lights are in a garage does the temp fall below 60f and are they 8" H.O. FIXTIRES? If so you can buy cold temp lamps they are marked "CT" and 110 watts verses 95watt MISER LAMPS miser lamp do not get bright unless the temp is above 60f.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    California
    Posts
    79
    Thank you for all the information.

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