Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Only a Licensed Electrical Contractor or Electrician?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    660

    Only a Licensed Electrical Contractor or Electrician?

    Does anyone know if there is a NEC or contractor licensing issue that would require underground PVC conduit to only be installed by a licensed electrician or a licensed electrical contractor? I am hearing that a contractor who was not low bidder is claiming the low bidder, because he is using labor that are not electricians, cannot install conduit in the dirt. These are spare conduits for future use and we don't even know when they will be used. (I am just the engineer so I have no axe to grind either way.)
    e^(i pi) = -1

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    17,135
    I did a quick review of some of the requirements in the Revised Code of Washington, and in particular, RCW 19.28.041. It seems to be saying that a license is required to install or maintain either (1) Wires that carry current, or (2) Equipment that is operated by current. I don't think empty conduits falls within the scope of the licensing requirements. I certainly may have missed another rule somewhere else in the RCW or the WAC, but that is all I know at the moment.
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    660

    Thank you

    Thanks for the citation. It confirms my basic belief.
    e^(i pi) = -1

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NE Arkansas
    Posts
    2,222
    This is an issue that depends on the local licensing laws. I have -several times- seen jurisdictions apply licensing laws to everyone who held any 'tools,' with the POSSIBLE exception of a shovel. Under such a regime the guys actually laying the conduit would be required to be licensed electricians or enrolled apprentices.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Gainesville, Florida
    Posts
    1,041

    Florida

    FLorida says you cant use temp help to do any electrical installation. If you are not getting a paycheck from an electrical contractor you cant install anything covered in the NEC. Ditch, pipe placement, etc ..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Olathe, Kansas 338 mi SE of Wingedhorses
    Posts
    1,885
    How is this any different than residental wiring ? The boss (master electrican )

    hires 15 guys to wire homes. No the workers are not licensed. They typically

    have 5 to 10 years experience, know the code rules & perform a compliant

    installation. The boss is responsible for all work performed. So what is the

    difference ?
    Electricity is Color Blind
    Leave the shirt pocket rules in your pocket.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Atlanta,GA
    Posts
    3,987
    Quote Originally Posted by beanland View Post
    Does anyone know if there is a NEC or contractor licensing issue that would require underground PVC conduit to only be installed by a licensed electrician or a licensed electrical contractor?
    My opinion: I would guess that you can hire anyone you want to install PVC conduit but the problem may come in the future when you wish to use it.

    Were these conduit runs ever permitted and inspected? If not it's now underground and kind of hard to see and no records of them ever haveing been approved ( they may never catch it ).

    All conduit is run for future use it just depends on how long before you use it, 10 minutes or ten years.
    "A sight for sore eyes to the blind would be awful magestic"---Wax Fang

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,849
    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    My opinion: I would guess that you can hire anyone you want to install PVC conduit but the problem may come in the future when you wish to use it.

    Were these conduit runs ever permitted and inspected? If not it's now underground and kind of hard to see and no records of them ever haveing been approved ( they may never catch it ).

    All conduit is run for future use it just depends on how long before you use it, 10 minutes or ten years.
    I can recall a job where we ran feeders in an existing underground conduit, and when the inspector came for inspection, he said the conduit was not inspected before it was covered, rip it up and start over, he even said he wanted to see the fill material, at times the utility inspectors can also need to inspect before back fill , if service feeds are going in the run,
    And you usually need a licensed contractor to secure a permit, so it makes sense if they had some labor guys run the conduit, it most likely was not inspected

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    19,215
    Quote Originally Posted by GUNNING View Post
    FLorida says you cant use temp help to do any electrical installation. If you are not getting a paycheck from an electrical contractor you cant install anything covered in the NEC. Ditch, pipe placement, etc ..
    Can you contract someone to dig a ditch - maybe because they have the necessary equipment and the licensed people actually install the raceway after the ditch is dug? What about directional boring? There is some equipment that every electrician has readily available.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    7,286
    Quote Originally Posted by GUNNING View Post
    FLorida says you cant use temp help to do any electrical installation. If you are not getting a paycheck from an electrical contractor you cant install anything covered in the NEC. Ditch, pipe placement, etc ..

    I don't believe this is an accurate statement. I am pretty well versed in the Florida Contractor Licensing laws and can't recall that particular prohibition. Day labor / temp workers have long been utilized by contractors of all types and categories here in Florida.

    In fact, many other licensed contractor categories are permit to perform limited electrical work associated with their particular trade. Examples would be mechanical contractors, plumbing contractors, swimming pool contractors, & solar contractors making final electrical connections to their equipment and appliances.

    There are other times where it may be appropriate and comnpletely legal for non-electrical workers to perform electrical work. Work performed by other trade-persons, under the supervision of an electrical contractor, would be an example. For example, steel workers, under the supervision of the EC of record, may actually install and connect the GEC to the footing steel on a project. Or, the pool shell contractor may actually install the and connect the bonding connections to the pool steel, where under the supervision of the EC of record.
    Bryan P. Holland, MCP

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •