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Thread: More residential generator installation questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    New Jersey
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    More residential generator installation questions

    I'm being told by several of my colleagues that the vast majority of residences in my area are equipped with Class 250 natural gas meters and that they may not be large enough to have the capacity to deliver enough gas for a generator, range, furnace, clothes dryer and water heater. Customers may be required to bump up to Class 400 meters at their expense. I was trying to find more information about this and found this website :

    http://premac.co/pdf/Cat_M_diafragmas.pdf

    but I don't know how to interpret the information. If any of you have some degree of plumbing background (no disrespect intended) would you please offer some insight ?

    I checked the specs on the following Generac units and found this NG consumption info :

    10KW - 102 ft3/hr @ 50% load

    14KW - 156 ft3/hr @ 50% load

    20KW - 206 ft3/hr @ 50% load

    I'm asking this because many of us are taking these jobs on as GC's and the onus will be on us not only for proper generator sizing but also for proper gas capacity sizing.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    New Jersey
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    19,107
    This site has a rough calculation:

    Do I have to do anything to my gas or electric meters?
    Not your electric meter, but quite possibly a larger gas meter may be required. Natural gas powered generators do use a sizeable amount of gas volume when they are operating, so it’s necessary to have a gas meter with enough volume to operate the generator and the other gas appliances in the house, i.e. furnace(s), stoves, cook tops, clothes dryers, hot water heaters etc. The gas meter typically has a plate on the front that lists its capacity in cubic feet/hour. One cubic foot per hour of gas volume equals approximately 1,000 BTUs. Total up the number of BTUs on the existing gas appliances and add to it the gas usage of the desired generator unit(see specification tables on this web site) and you can determine the required meter capacity. The homeowner is responsible for contacting the gas company to have a new meter installed if required.
    http://yourhomegenerator.com/SECONDARY/faq.html
    Rob

    Chief Moderator

    All responses based on the 2011 NEC unless otherwise noted

  3. #3
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    Thanks Rob

  4. #4
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    Just thought you would all like to know what would happen if you logged onto a plumbers' forum and asked this or a similar question :

    http://www.plumbingzone.com/f2/gener...-meters-16361/

    They're such pleasant people. But I guess we would probably treat them the same if they logged onto our forum and began asking electrical questions

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Raeford, NC
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    3,479
    Try looking at this also http://www.guardiangenerators.com/Pu...0172610SBY.pdf
    Look at page 8 & 9
    Organized people are people that are just too lazy to look for their stuff

  6. #6
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    New Jersey
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    Thanks CEB. That was a helpful publication. I just looked at the gas meter in my house and it's capable of delivering 275cu. ft/hr. Based on my calculations it looks like I may have to call PSE&G and upgrade my gas meter.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    222

    That's good stuff. Thanks for sharing!

    Quote Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
    Just thought you would all like to know what would happen if you logged onto a plumbers' forum and asked this or a similar question :

    http://www.plumbingzone.com/f2/gener...-meters-16361/

    They're such pleasant people. But I guess we would probably treat them the same if they logged onto our forum and began asking electrical questions
    Chris Sharp
    Certifiable Electrician

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hackettstown, New Jersey
    Posts
    128

    Typical Plumbers

    What's stupid about that whole thing is that if we are knowlegeable enough to provide a fast, accurate quote to the consumer it's an easier sell for us which in some cases is going to translate into more work for them. I had a good friend of mine, who is a licensed plumber, walk me through the things I need to look at to provide the correct price. Lucky for us in New Jersey, we don't need a plumbing license for gas.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
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    Quote Originally Posted by krisinjersey View Post
    Lucky for us in New Jersey, we don't need a plumbing license for gas.
    That's true but as far as I'm concerned, the liability in doing the gas piping is greater than what the job is worth to me. Besides, I'm not geared up for plumbing work. My truck is already packed with things I need to do electrical work.

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