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Thread: Problems with TR receptacles

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    514

    Problems with TR receptacles

    We have now had two occasions where clients have complained about TR receptacles being too difficult to plug things into. On the first cmplaint I assumed they wer just not pushing evenly into the receptacle. As it turned out, they were actually just really hard to plug in. We swapped out 4 of the receptacles and everything was OK. Now we have a complaint from another client that says they have tried random locations throughout the house and all but a few are very hard to plug into. This latest batch is Cooper and the first onew were Hubble.

    Have any of you had similar problems?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    5,899
    Yes, I had to replace one at my own house. I do not remember the brand. I could not get anything into it.
    Tom
    TBLO

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Tennessee NEC:2008
    Posts
    2,956
    I have, and the Cooper seems to be the worst. P&S seems to work ok.
    Let me add, the Cooper in a GFCI was the worst, might have been a bad batch.
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    central iowa
    Posts
    22
    i use p and s and leviton and they seem to be uniform. I explain to the customer about them and how to make sure to be even and square when you are plugging stuff in, i have never had to change one yet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,827
    No call-backs here either. Of course I stick my tester in every one that I install, top and bottom, so maybe I'm just loosening up the mechanism to get it started for them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NE Arkansas
    Posts
    2,222
    Gee, and I remember all the manufacturers and other 'experts' telling us how these new TR receptacles were perfect, plug insertion would be easy, and that even old folks with arthritis had no problems.

    How about ..... we drop the TR requirement. I'm willing to accept limiting it to specific locations, such as places normally accessible to children in child-care centers. Applying the requirement to a single receptacle on the ceiling of the garage is beyond silly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    49,022
    Quote Originally Posted by renosteinke View Post
    How about ..... we drop the TR requirement. I'm willing to accept limiting it to specific locations, such as places normally accessible to children in child-care centers. Applying the requirement to a single receptacle on the ceiling of the garage is beyond silly.
    How about not? TRs are a good idea and add little to costs.

    As noted some brands are better than others.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,256
    Quote Originally Posted by iwire View Post
    How about not? TRs are a good idea and add little to costs.

    As noted some brands are better than others.
    How about they get the design right before putting them on the market? When they eventually hit my rental property those folk aren't gonna be slowed by "hard to insert". They'll just bust the thing. Then it'll be worse than without a TR.
    A rose by any other name is tax deductible [1978 Wayne Wilcox]
    People who read too many books get quirky. [2000 John Taylor Gatto]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    234
    I was told that the locking mechanism on them, at times breaks, so that you can not plug into them. Sure they will replace them, but we are out of a trip back.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NE Arkansas
    Posts
    2,222
    "TRs are a good idea"

    Just because something is a good idea does not mean it ought to become a matter of law. Let the market decide.

    Case in point: There's no law that says gas stations must have public restrooms. Yet, it's a good idea. Ordinary market forces had resulted not only in nearly every gas station having a public restroom, but they often compete in the quality of their facilities.

    Free markets work every time they're allowed to operate.

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