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Thread: 4000 watt wall heater on #12 Nm 20 amp circuit

  1. #1
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    4000 watt wall heater on #12 Nm 20 amp circuit

    What do you think about a electric wall heater 4000 watts fed from a dedicated 12 guage 20 amp circuit?
    Nec says continuous and I calculate 16.67 amps X 1.25% +20.84 amps can ypu still use a 20 amp circuit. I am seeing this quite often done. However does it comply if you replace with a new and different heater?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Looks like no can do, your fractions are more than 0.5


    220.5 Calculations.

    (B) Fractions of an Ampere.
    Calculations shall be permitted
    to be rounded to the nearest whole ampere, with decimal
    fractions smaller than 0.5 dropped.

  3. #3
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    No relief from the small breaker rule for this app.

    424.22 Overcurrent Protection.
    (A) Branch-Circuit Devices. Electric space-heating equipment,
    other than such motor-operated equipment as required
    by Articles 430 and 440 to have additional overcurrent protection,
    shall be permitted to be protected against overcurrent
    where supplied by one of the branch circuits in Article 210.
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derék

  4. #4
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    If the heater had a timer that could not be set for more than three hours would that make it a non-continuous load?
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  5. #5
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    I think I'd see if I could swap the guts to a 3500w heater. If it's a Pick-a-watt or Cadet heater, you might get lucky.

  6. #6
    Maybe you have 245 volts?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    If the heater had a timer that could not be set for more than three hours would that make it a non-continuous load?
    Negative, the 125% rule applies to electric space heating equipment without exception.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlennH View Post
    Maybe you have 245 volts?
    The reality of the situation is probably just that- 245V or 244 either of which would allow the 20 amp circuit. Problem is that 244-245V, even if measured, may not always be that high and cannot be used. That really stinks. The manufacturer should make the units work on 240V on a 20 amp cir.-- a 3840 watt heater...

    I assume the voltage at the building is 240V.

  9. #9
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    The reality of the situation is probably just that- 245V or 244 either of which would allow the 20 amp circuit.
    The reality is it would draw more current at 244 or 245 volts.

  10. #10
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    Thanks, Going to replace with a 3000 w unit.

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