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Thread: Well Duh!

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gar View Post
    Jim already provided his comment.
    I don't remember stating a preference.
    Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

  2. #22
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    120305-2007 EST

    Jim:

    What did you mean by "I preffered my TI SR-50" in post #8?

    .

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by gar View Post
    120305-2007 EST

    Jim:

    What did you mean by "I prefered my TI SR-50" in post #8?

    .
    It meant that I liked my SR-50 better than the HP's that were offered wayback in 1974. But for the life of me, I cannot remember the specific advantage it had.
    Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim dungar View Post
    It meant that I liked my SR-50 better than the HP's that were offered wayback in 1974. But for the life of me, I cannot remember the specific advantage it had.
    The funny thing is, is that the people who started MOSTEK were ex Texas Instrument employees go figure

    I still like Micron Technologies for mem which was a spin off of MOSTEK
    Wayne A. From: N.W.Indiana
    Be Fair, Be Safe
    Just don't be fairly safe

  5. #25
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    Interesting notes about the hp-35

    To achieve better efficiency in their LED drive, hp charged tiny inductors with bipolar xitters, then let them discharge into the LEDs.

    MOSTEK talked hp into selling the 35s through mail order.

    One guy who didn't receive a free 35, scrounged some chips and built his own 45 in a metal case and full size keys. Ugly, but it worked. The 35 used 3 256 word ROMs in TO-5 cans, the 45 used a 1024 word ROM on a single chip. I think.

    After he 35 was introduced one of the slide rule companies came to visit. Their marketing manager pull a 35 out of his pocket and said, "We want one of those". Had to turn him down.

    Another fellow came in with a design based on an analog computer. Had drawings pinned to the wall all around the conference room. Said it had to run a 1MZ clock rate. hp clock was 200KHZ. Had to turn him down too.

    hp didn't even consider TI because they feared they would be a competitor. They visited MOSTEK and at the end of the meeting, said "when can you start". Very few legalities.
    Don't mess with B+!
    (Signal Corps. Motto)

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rattus View Post
    I get the ridicule and insults anyway. What is especially galling is that I was part of the team that developed the hp-35.
    Thank you. I bought one when they came out & still have it. Alas, it no longer functions.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Open Neutral View Post
    Thank you. I bought one when they came out & still have it. Alas, it no longer functions.
    You might have the battery pack rebuilt. Batteries Plus might do it. One of our local hardware stores does it.
    Don't mess with B+!
    (Signal Corps. Motto)

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by gar View Post

    It is too bad that H and P don't still run the company. My earliest knowledge of the company was when Sy Sterling was just starting as a sales rep for HP about 46 or 47 when he demonstrated the HP oscillator. It was probably a 200 something. By the early 50s it was a 200CD. I bought one of those about 61, and still have it. In the early 50s I used several 200CDs in psychophysical audio experiments.

    .
    The 200CD was an amazing piece of gear. It lasted so long (1952-1985!!) in the product line that it required a redesign when octal tubes went out of production. I own an old one, alas no functioning, that was property of Crosley Radio. Alas, in attempting to wash the outer case, all the paint came off...including the Crosley markings.

    New ones are 9-pin miniature tubes.

    If you have one with a 4-digit SN#.......

  9. #29
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    120309-0736 EST

    Open Neutral:

    My 200CD from 1961 is S/N 109-31487. So that is a fairly high number.

    However, the 200CDs in the picture at my website below could have been low numbers. These or at least one would have been bought late 1953. See photo P21 on this page http://www.beta-aa.com/misc_photos.html

    I believe the scope in the photo was a DuMont, and the voltmeters HP 400H.

    Also before 1955 HP brought out their first oscilloscope.

    .

  10. #30
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    I still have my trusty 41CV that got me through engineering school in the 80's. We don' need no steenking equals sign!

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