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Thread: Ground crimp damaging wires -- what's wrong?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkb View Post
    Ideal purchased the Buchanan name years ago, but still sell the Buchanan line.
    I have never seen the sleeve crimp tool listed under another brand.

    You can still get the Buchanan sleeves and snap-on covers, also the rubber diaper covers.
    When I started in the trade we used Buchanan crimp sleeves for all splices and used the snap-on covers.
    And they very possibly make the sleeves with the GB name on the package.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    Funny that tool is made by Ideal. Does GB actually require a specific tool to be used with their 310 crimps? I couldn't find a specific GB 310 tool.
    Quote Originally Posted by tkb View Post
    Who cares that Ideal makes it?
    A crimp sleeve is a crimp sleeve.
    The Buchanan four way crimper is specifically designed for crimp sleeves.
    A tried and true tool that has been around for at least 40-50 years. I got mine about 1975.

    Why would GB even sell these and not a tool designed for them unless they intend for you to use whatever tools would work.

    Maybe smashing it with a rock would be listed for this crimp?
    IMO the combination of sleeve and crimper should be listed to be used together. For what it's worth the OP stated that his crimper was damaging the conductors. Maybe a rock would work better.
    Rob

    Chief Moderator

    All responses based on the 2011 NEC unless otherwise noted

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    IMO the combination of sleeve and crimper should be listed to be used together. For what it's worth the OP stated that his crimper was damaging the conductors. Maybe a rock would work better.
    And the crimper he showed is a different type and probably is not listed to be used together with the sleeves he is using. The Buchanan and Ideal models (that are likely the same thing) may be (probably are) listed to use with the GB sleeves.

  4. #14
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    Nov 2007
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    Seattle, WA
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    On the GB website their hand tools PDF only has mention of the #310 for this tool, which looks to be not much different from the generic crimper I was using, or other ones in the same catalog (http://www.gardnerbender.com/products/hand_tools.html). The back of the package of the #310 has the GB-5000A listed as the appropriate tool, but I have not been able to find this in store or online or on their catalog. No idea.

    I am going to get the Buchanon tool. Thanks so much for the help everyone.
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  5. #15
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    Feb 2012
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    Truckee, CA
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    Are you using solid or stranded wire? I've never had much luck crimping any kind of connector on solid wire. But I've been crimping insulated butt splice connectors for years with the T &B crimper that is similar to the Klein crimper and have had no problems. When I was in the nuclear power industry, we were required to use calibrated ratchet type crimpers that left a small set of "nibs" on the insulated barrel to identify which tool was used. Wrong tool meant cut it off and do it over (if you had enough wire). I think that was overkill!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Also one other thing to check is what your crimp is made of. Buchanons are made of copper and the four point crimp tool which is required for a buchanon per its instructions crimp those easily. However a pt 80 which I believe is made by t and b is made of copper colored or coated steel and they will allow you to use just regular crimpers. I have seen the p.t.80 damage a buchanon 4 point crimper. You can feel the difference when trying to crimp a pt compared to a buchanon. That's my two cents for what its worth.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidTu View Post
    These are the ones I was using.

    http://www.service.kleintools.com/To...N/Product/1005

    LEO2854's seem like the nib is less sharp.

    Are the ones I am using perhaps only meant for terminal connectors not the cylindrical crimp sleeves?

    Any other suggestions?

    Thanks.
    I've used nothing but the tool in this pic for over 35 years and never had a problem.
    I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

    There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.

    John Childress
    Electrical Inspector
    IAEI / CEI / C10
    Certified Electrical Inspector

  8. #18
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    Nov 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyjwc View Post
    I've used nothing but the tool in this pic for over 35 years and never had a problem.
    Cowboy, are you using the forward or rearward crimp opening when using this one? I have since posting this tried to use the opening w/o the nib (ie. the rearward one) and it seems to work better at not damaging the wires, but it does flatten out the crimp sleeve so not sure if that's a good enough connection or not. Seem ok though. How do you do it? If you are using the nib, are you just applying light pressure? Maybe I was overdoing the squeeze w/ the nib?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidTu View Post
    Cowboy, are you using the forward or rearward crimp opening when using this one? I have since posting this tried to use the opening w/o the nib (ie. the rearward one) and it seems to work better at not damaging the wires, but it does flatten out the crimp sleeve so not sure if that's a good enough connection or not. Seem ok though. How do you do it? If you are using the nib, are you just applying light pressure? Maybe I was overdoing the squeeze w/ the nib?
    I always used the rearward crimp. I might not have got a good look at the pic, but mine has a nib on both, just one is bigger than the other, the little one would do as you describe, so that's why I always used the bigger one. And no you don't have to smash it, just pinch it down and then check it like you would a wire nut.
    I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

    There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.

    John Childress
    Electrical Inspector
    IAEI / CEI / C10
    Certified Electrical Inspector

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Richmond, California
    Posts
    36

    No crimping allowed

    The cities I've worked in (San Franciso Bay area) don't allow crimping due to wire damage. Wirenuts only most of the time.

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