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Thread: Ford Powerstroke 6.0 diesel work vehicle owners..... take note....

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA (21 Hrs. 32 Min. from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    3,554
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Automobile work is not as simple as it once was, and there is a lot more inside
    the engine than a bunch of bolts. Not saying you can not tear an engine apart
    and successfully put it back together again, but there are things that if not done
    correctly, tightened to proper torque, avoid dirt, water, other foreign materials,
    you can really mess something up.
    this isn't your grandma's diesel either. i have two generations of machinists
    in my family tree before me, and i could read micrometers before i figured out
    how to do fractions. dad got me an old 6" swing lathe for my eighth birthday.

    my first engine swap was when i was 12, and the 18 year old two doors down
    let me help put a 327 FI chevy in his XKE jag. i got to clean and assemble
    the hillborn mechanical injector under his supervision... ran good...

    i would not rebuild a 6.0 ford diesel cold. there are too many subtle "unimportant"
    things that can totally screw up the rebuild, that you have no way of knowing about
    until it's too late... all engines have quirks, but this engine can elevate minor oopsies
    to catastrophic proportions. the minutae is daunting.

    this is an engine if you have it gone thru, you want it done by a good mechanic who has
    done several truckloads of this engine type... that's my read on it.
    “Give a person a fish and you feed them for a day;
    teach that person to use the Internet and they won't bother you for weeks.”

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    durham,nc
    Posts
    42
    I tried the legit route using Mechanics but one guy left the wire off my starter , while changing my clutch, and fired my alternator . I really hard to argue with him to get him to pay for the alternator Next time , different mechanic , I told him the timing chain had skipped a teeth. They told me my distributor jump and they had to "grind off" the stop to get the timing in. Next day same problem then told me it was the timing chain and charged me for both Ruining my distributor and the original request. Modern cars are EASIER to work on because you plug a tool into a port and it tells you which sensor is bad. No truck no work so for me it's faster to fix it myself and pay myself the $100+ an hr they charge . Around here
    all an Electrician can get is $50-70/ hr

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    19,156
    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    this isn't your grandma's diesel either. i have two generations of machinists
    in my family tree before me, and i could read micrometers before i figured out
    how to do fractions. dad got me an old 6" swing lathe for my eighth birthday.

    my first engine swap was when i was 12, and the 18 year old two doors down
    let me help put a 327 FI chevy in his XKE jag. i got to clean and assemble
    the hillborn mechanical injector under his supervision... ran good...

    i would not rebuild a 6.0 ford diesel cold. there are too many subtle "unimportant"
    things that can totally screw up the rebuild, that you have no way of knowing about
    until it's too late... all engines have quirks, but this engine can elevate minor oopsies
    to catastrophic proportions. the minutae is daunting.

    this is an engine if you have it gone thru, you want it done by a good mechanic who has
    done several truckloads of this engine type... that's my read on it.
    I was helping my dad when I was only 12 or so also. He liked working on diesel engines the most, and was very good at it. He been a truck driver last 15 years or so and although still knows a lot of info, really is not up to speed on current technologies. He might do some light work on something older if he has to but the new stuff is not really what it used to be. Even diesel engines that once had nothing electric at all on them are now loaded with sensors, electronic controls, and if a processor goes bad you are pretty much not doing anything at all with that engine, maybe not even running it enough to pull off the road or something of that nature. But they can get more power out of same or even lighter engine than they used to also.

    Then came the 2007 emissions requirements - sounds like that was a setback for power and performance for diesel engines. But that is life - us electricians had to go through the changes in last couple of code editions whether we liked the changes or not.

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