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Thread: A diesel generator question

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
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    5,811
    To add,

    Some heavy equipment will have both a governor and a cruise control.

    The governor is used to control engine speed when using a PTO, for instance. The cruise is used to maintain vehicle speed while driving.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Michigan. It's a beautiful penninsula, I've looked around.
    Posts
    5,811
    Quote Originally Posted by iwire View Post
    I am at a loss as to why you feel they are so different.


    Basically the only difference is the placement and / or type of sensor providing the input to the controller.

    In the end both systems control the flow of fuel or air into the engine in repose to conditions.
    I have worked on both. They are entirely different critters. Governors don't need sensors. They can operate centrifugally. They can be connected directly to the throttle via one single linkage.

    Cruise controls take input from the drive line and adjust the throttle by either pneumatic or electric means. You won't see a cruise control that operates a throttle directly with a single linkage. The linkage or cable will be connected to an electric or a pneumatic transducer somewhere. That transducer will get its info by either electrical or mechanical means. Today we have sensors, but back in the 80's the transducer was connected to the speedometer cable.

    Have I justified my position??
    Last edited by K8MHZ; 04-19-12 at 12:48 PM.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
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    6,342
    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    Not really.

    (I have been working on cruise controls since they first came out. I have rebuilt many transducers).

    Cruise controls respond to a change in vehicle speed, not engine rpm. Unlike a governor, engine rpm can drop to an idle or red line as conditions require.
    The basic principle is the same. Closed loop speed control. The governor on a genny maintains shaft rotational speed. On a car, it maintains road speed.
    The car I currently drive, like most in the UK, has a manual box. Thus, when I set the cruise control, it keeps both the engine RPM and the road speed constant.



    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    I used to be a certified mechanic. I worked on many Brit cars and have a love like no other for Lucas electrical systems. This was a while ago, but I used to work on Jags, MG's, and Triumphs that were collector items. Meaning, for the most part, they sat around collecting dust because they were too unreliable to drive on a daily basis.
    Actually, one of the nicest cars I had was a Triumph 2500TC. It had a a sweet six pot in-line 2500cc petrol engine and a four speed box with overdrive on the top two cogs. So, effectively, six forward ratios. Top slot gave me just a bit over 2,000 rpm at 70mph, the UK legal speed limit and reasonably decent fuel consumption. I did all the servicing myself - oil, filters, spark plugs, points, timing, brake pads....stuff.
    It gave me 100,000 miles of serene motoring. As was still running sweet as a nut when I departed with it.
    Next car was a dog. A German Ford, the top of the range, and the engine failed after about 9,000 miles.
    After a couple of further bad foreign experiences I got the 12 pot jag in the avatar.
    Then another 100,000 serene miles but with a bit of a kick from the 300bhp sweet revving Brown's Lane product.
    But fuel prices here.......

    Mods, please forgive my off topic response....

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    16
    Check the hose between the tank and the fuel pump. Older hoses at high flow can create enough suction to collapse and starve the engine. Also, i think a technician on site is your answer. If the first guy didnt get it another might if the additional few kw are that important.

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