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Thread: ohm's law sucks.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    missed a 120 volt receptacle on a bid.

    30' up in the air, feeding a wifi repeater.
    7 amp load.
    Seven Amps for a WiFI repeater?
    Sounds a lot.

  2. #32
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    Did we ever hear what size wire the plans call for? Most jobs I've bid tell you the wire size somewhere.
    Lou (wannabe economist)

    If you relentlessly pursue perfection, you will eventually catch excellence.

  3. #33
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    I was just awarded a job. The plans may be complete next week.
    Tom
    TBLO

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwire View Post
    Other than for fire pumps and maybe a couple of other things the NEC does not have voltage drop limitations.
    But local code may. The Florida building code limits voltage drop throughout the state for example.


    I know what I don't know, and I know where to go to find it!

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strathead View Post
    But local code may. The Florida building code limits voltage drop throughout the state for example.
    What is their limit?
    Lou (wannabe economist)

    If you relentlessly pursue perfection, you will eventually catch excellence.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardworkingstiff View Post
    What is their limit?
    3% for branch circuits, 2% for feeders. It used to be in chapter 13, but I think it just cahnged in the 2010 code adopted in April.


    I know what I don't know, and I know where to go to find it!

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardworkingstiff View Post
    Did we ever hear what size wire the plans call for?
    Most jobs I've bid tell you the wire size somewhere.
    the prints will call for two #6 and #8 ground.

    i haven't drawn them yet.

    it was my shortfall, i didn't realize the repeaters would pull that much.
    i was figuring a nominal 180 watts per device, a quad would give 360 watts, or three amps.

    i am now the proud owner of six rolls of #6 simpull, and three rolls of #8 green simpull.
    $2,200 or so.

    next time, i'll clarify something like that.... 'eh, it's only THREE OUTLETS, not even something to consider.... ;-)
    “Give a person a fish and you feed them for a day;
    teach that person to use the Internet and they won't bother you for weeks.”

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    the prints will call for two #6 and #8 ground.
    If this is a 20 amp circuit and conductor size is increased to #6 for voltage drop purposes then the equipment grounding conductor also needs to be increased to #6.

    If this is a 60 amp circuit using 6 AWG conductors - the equipment grounding conductor can be 10 AWG.

    Just doesn't quite sound right does it? But that is what code says.

    A code compliant way to use the 10 AWG EGC is to run a feeder to near the outlet with 10AWG EGC. Then run shorter 20 amp branch circuit to the outlet with smaller conductors.
    Last edited by kwired; 05-30-12 at 10:28 PM.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    If this is a 20 amp circuit and conductor size is increased to #6 for voltage drop purposes then the equipment grounding conductor also needs to be increased to #6.

    If this is a 60 amp circuit using 6 AWG conductors - the equipment grounding conductor can be 10 AWG.

    Just doesn't quite sound right does it? But that is what code says.

    A code compliant way to use the 10 AWG EGC is to run a feeder to near the outlet with 10AWG EGC. Then run shorter 20 amp branch circuit to the outlet with smaller conductors.
    I disagree. The EGC only has to be increased in size proportionately when the ungrounded conductors are upsized, not to the same size as the ungrounded conductors. See 250.122(B)

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by texie View Post
    I disagree. The EGC only has to be increased in size proportionately when the ungrounded conductors are upsized, not to the same size as the ungrounded conductors. See 250.122(B)
    Well I thought that is what I was explaining

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