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Thread: gas line bonding/grounding

  1. #1
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    gas line bonding/grounding

    Hi
    gas company has been called to turn on the meter of an apartment in a 17 unit apartment building. They claim there is 9 volts on gas line and they will not connect the gas. what should be done? bonding to cold water and metal part of electrical meters solve it? Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by abe View Post
    Hi
    gas company has been called to turn on the meter of an apartment in a 17 unit apartment building. They claim there is 9 volts on gas line and they will not connect the gas. what should be done? bonding to cold water and metal part of electrical meters solve it? Thanks
    Find the source of voltage. It may also exist on the water piping, as well as the equipment grounding conductors even if they are all bonded together. I ask gas tech exactly where, what, how he measured voltage.

  3. #3
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    Section 250.104(B) requires bonding metal piping systems other than water piping systems. That includes gas.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by abe View Post
    Hi
    gas company has been called to turn on the meter of an apartment in a 17 unit apartment building. They claim there is 9 volts on gas line and they will not connect the gas. what should be done? bonding to cold water and metal part of electrical meters solve it? Thanks
    Rewire the complex for all electric heat and appliances. That'll fix 'em.

    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    ..... ask gas tech exactly where, what, how he measured voltage.
    This is probably a more workable course of action, and is what I would do. I would also talk to someone higher up at the gas company before I did any extra work.
    If Billy Idol or John Denver is on your Ipod go and re-evaluate your life.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    Rewire the complex for all electric heat and appliances. That'll fix 'em.
    Connect electric fence charger to it and call him back and tell him you fixed it

  6. #6
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    Look at NEC 250.52(B). You cannot use metal underground gas piping systems as a grounding electrode. So if you bond it then it will become a grounding electrode. But if there is an insulating coupling inside the meter then you could bond on the premises side of the coupling.
    Eric Kench, P.E.


    If it's not broken don't fix it

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by erickench View Post
    Look at NEC 250.52(B). You cannot use metal underground gas piping systems as a grounding electrode. So if you bond it then it will become a grounding electrode.
    No it won't. It just becomes a piece of metal that is bonded to an electrical service.
    "Electricity is actually made up of extremely tiny particles called electrons, that you cannot see with the naked eye unless you have been drinking."

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by stickboy1375 View Post
    No it won't. It just becomes a piece of metal that is bonded to an electrical service.
    If that piece of metal is electrically continuous to the earth it will act as an electrode and is therefore a violation even though it wasn't anyone's intention that a gas pipe should be an electrode.
    Eric Kench, P.E.


    If it's not broken don't fix it

  9. #9
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    There should be an insulating coupling inside the gas meter that electrically isolates the interior gas pipe from the earth. You must bond on the premises side of that coupling. If you bond on the utility side it will become an electrode and therefore a violation.
    Eric Kench, P.E.


    If it's not broken don't fix it

  10. #10
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    Now for a shot of reality. Few years back I was involved in rennovations because of a fire in a kitchen on a farm house.

    Fire started when lightning struck power pole only 30 - 50 feet from house. Followed service drop to house, through service equipment, through bare neutral of an SE cable running to an electric range outlet. The installed range was gas range using LP gas supplied by copper tubing under the house and out to a tank in the yard. Best we can tell lightning arced from electric range outlet to the gas pipe. The fire definately started behind the range and right after that lightning strike. If that gas piping had an insulating fitting why would that have stopped this event when the gap from the outlet to the pipe would have been much farther than an insulating fitting would have provided?

    BTW there was no installed grounding electrode at the service so this was next best thing. No guarantee it would have stopped this event but couldn't have hurt anything. We did install grounding electrode as part of the repairs.

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