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Thread: GFIC

  1. #1
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    Sep 2004
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    GFIC

    I ran across something that had me scratching my head. I was replacing a GFIC in a bath room and looked at the sticker on the old gfic and it said not for use in wet locations. The new one said the same thing. Am I missing something here. I thought all gfic's were for wet locations.

    gus
    gusco

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    GFCI's are installed in locations for which the equipment being plugged in might get wet. That does not mean that it is expected that the receptacle itself is likely to get wet. A bathroom wall is not a "wet location," as that phrase is defined in the NEC.
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2007
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    There are Wet location units available for those required wet location areas.

  4. #4
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    I think this issue is about the new ruling for weather resistant receptacles to be used outdoors. Apparently the new devices are more sunlight resistant and maybe have something else built in to make them more resistant to weather.

  5. #5
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    I think would all GFCI would be for wet locations. Any place within 6" of a sink or water needs GFCI protection. The GFCI for outdoors needs to be weather protected. So why a would GFCI say not for use in wet location, makes no sense. GFCI are for wet location period. If I don't have a wet location I don't use a GFCI . These GFCI said right on them not for wet locations.
    gusco

  6. #6
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    Ok ok maybe I reading 210.8 wrong
    gusco

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by guschash View Post
    I think would all GFCI would be for wet locations. Any place within 6" of a sink or water needs GFCI protection. The GFCI for outdoors needs to be weather protected. So why a would GFCI say not for use in wet location, makes no sense. GFCI are for wet location period. If I don't have a wet location I don't use a GFCI.
    What you are missing is that it is not the GFCI receptacle itself that we are concerned about getting wet, but rather the thing that is plugged into the receptacle. You put GFCI receptacles in bathrooms and within 6 feet of a sink because the homeowner might plug in a hair dryer and accidentally drop it into the sink. You put GFCI receptacles outdoors because the homeowner might plug in an extension cord and then drag the cord across some wet grass. But unless you plan on using your power washer to hose down your bathroom wall, the location of the receptacle itself is not classified as a "wet location."
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  8. #8
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    NH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    I think this issue is about the new ruling for weather resistant receptacles to be used outdoors. Apparently the new devices are more sunlight resistant and maybe have something else built in to make them more resistant to weather.
    Like stainless steel screws
    "Appliances and wiring will burn out to protect fuses"

  9. #9
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    stainless yokes and screws
    Last edited by Cavie; 08-14-12 at 10:56 PM.
    Unlimited Electric Contractor/Standard Electric Inspector/Traffic Signal Inspector/Highway Lighting and Level One Traffic Signal Installer.

    I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
    I think this issue is about the new ruling for weather resistant receptacles to be used outdoors. Apparently the new devices are more sunlight resistant and maybe have something else built in to make them more resistant to weather.
    Couple have mentioned stainless components, possible the plug contacts are even stainless or something with more corrosion resistance than the standard receptacle has. I don't know about whether or not they use different plastics that may be more sunlight resistant, first I have heard this mentioned.

    guschash, not all required locations for GFCI protection are wet locations, the presence of water is fairly common with locations required, but only because it generally increases the risk of shock, which is what the GFCI is all about.

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