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Thread: USB Receptacle

  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mgraw View Post
    This is from Leviton

    "The 2.1 Amp USB outlets on this USB Charger/Tamper Resistant Outlet are
    optimized for use with certain types of devices....."

    Would that mean two outlets and a receptacle?
    The way I read the NEC, this would be three receptacles in one outlet.

    Each USP charging port is a receptacle, and of course the 120 volt receptacle.

    If you can plug three plugs into the outlet, there has to be three receptacles.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  2. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    ... What is a single USB port on a single yoke?
    With its associated electronics, a utilization device (equipment).

    Can it be installed on a small appliance branch circuit?
    IMO, not by itself... whereas the OP combo device should be compliant.

    I say it is or is connected to an "outlet" but is not a receptacle outlet either.
    If just a USB Charger, and no 120V receptacle, I agree.
    I'll never get there. No matter where I go, I'm always here.

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    The way I read the NEC, this would be three receptacles in one outlet.

    Each USP charging port is a receptacle, and of course the 120 volt receptacle.

    If you can plug three plugs into the outlet, there has to be three receptacles.
    IMO, red is wrong.

    One outlet. One receptacle. One utilization device.
    I'll never get there. No matter where I go, I'm always here.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smart $ View Post
    IMO, red is wrong.

    One outlet. One receptacle. One utilization device.
    From the NEC:

    Receptacle: A receptacle is a contact device installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug. A single receptacle is a single contact device with no other contact device on the same yoke. A multiple receptacle is two or more contact devices on the same yoke.

    So, would you agree that this would be a 'multiple receptacle'? Or do you think the USB transformers (all that is there is the power supply) with nothing plugged into them are utilization devices? Even if they are, there still exists a total of three separate contact devices for the connection of an attachment plug all on a single yoke.

    Edit to add: How many receptacles are on the device in my avatar picture?
    Last edited by K8MHZ; 02-09-13 at 12:00 PM.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    So, would you agree that this would be a 'multiple receptacle'?
    No.

    Or do you think the USB transformers (all that is there is the power supply) with nothing plugged into them are utilization devices?
    Yes.

    Even if they are, there still exists a total of three separate contact devices for the connection of an attachment plug all on a single yoke.
    Are you really going to stretch the receptacle definition to this degree???

    If you are, I'll let someone else muster a response

    Edit to add: How many receptacles are on the device in my avatar picture?
    Four.
    I'll never get there. No matter where I go, I'm always here.

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smart $ View Post

    Are you really going to stretch the receptacle definition to this degree???

    It's not my definition. This is right out of the book: "A receptacle is a contact device installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug."

    Attachment Plug: A device that, by insertion into a receptacle, establishes a connection between the conductors of the attached flexible cord and the conductors connected permanently to the receptacle.

    Actually, there is nothing USB about the device. There is no bus connection. It's a 5 volt DC power supply with two contact devices installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug.

    I'm not making this stuff up.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  7. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    It's not my definition. This is right out of the book: "A receptacle is a contact device installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug."

    Attachment Plug: A device that, by insertion into a receptacle, establishes a connection between the conductors of the attached flexible cord and the conductors connected permanently to the receptacle.

    Actually, there is nothing USB about the device. There is no bus connection. It's a 5 volt DC power supply with two contact devices installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug.

    I'm not making this stuff up.
    I know you're not... I just don't want to be dealing with this. Perhaps I can short circuit it real quick. What is the rating of the USB "jacks" you are calling receptacles? One of the earlier posts said 2.1A. There you go... not qualified to be on the circuit.
    Last edited by Smart $; 02-09-13 at 01:58 PM. Reason: added smiley
    I'll never get there. No matter where I go, I'm always here.

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smart $ View Post
    I know you're not... I just don't want to be dealing with this. Perhaps I can short circuit it real quick. What is the rating of the USB "jacks" you are calling receptacles? One of the earlier posts said 2.1A. There you go... not qualified to be on the circuit.
    I went to the P&S website and looked at the specs. They are rated at 15 or 20 amps, depending on the model. 2.1 amps is the charging capacity.

    The brochure showed some interesting variations. 4 USB recept. and no 120v. and 2 USB recepts. and a switch on the same yoke.

    I think this is something the NEC needs to address as I don't believe these were around when the rule was written. They (NEC folk) probably meant 120 VAC receptacles and since that was all there really was at the time, it was left 'unsaid'. Now with the intro of 5VDC devices, there needs to be some clarification as the NEC defines the 5VDC 'ports' or 'jacks' or whatever pseudonym you choose to be 'receptacles'.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  9. #79
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    P&S calls them 'outlets'.

    Two USB “A” style
    charging outlets plus
    a 15-amp TR receptacle
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    I went to the P&S website and looked at the specs. They are rated at 15 or 20 amps, depending on the model. 2.1 amps is the charging capacity.

    The brochure showed some interesting variations. 4 USB recept. and no 120v. and 2 USB recepts. and a switch on the same yoke.

    I think this is something the NEC needs to address as I don't believe these were around when the rule was written. They (NEC folk) probably meant 120 VAC receptacles and since that was all there really was at the time, it was left 'unsaid'. Now with the intro of 5VDC devices, there needs to be some clarification as the NEC defines the 5VDC 'ports' or 'jacks' or whatever pseudonym you choose to be 'receptacles'.
    That's what really needs to happen. In the meantime, I say ignore them. Consider the yoke as whatever 120V device is on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    P&S calls them 'outlets'.
    Manufacturers are not required to use NEC-only terminology.
    I'll never get there. No matter where I go, I'm always here.

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