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Thread: Arc Flash Training

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    1,545

    Arc Flash Training

    Had arc flash training this week with my new employer and they issued me a suit, visor, hood & gloves. All fit neatly into a small box; easy to carry around and have nearby.

    This co follows the no live work/arc flash protection rules.

    I am still getting acclimated to this way of thinking. I have worked live for years on end. However; the trainer said the co. was able to get much lower insurance rates, which I fully understand. I paid a lot for the cheapest comp I could find, which covered little. A former boss paid about 4,000 a year for comp with only 1-2 employees. I can only imagine what my boss now pays, with around 20 employees. Trainer also told me there about 400 AF accidents last year in NC alone. I knew of a few and knew 1 guy personally, brother of a former boss. He will always be under care for his injuries.

    I tried on several sizes of coveralls & gloves to get the best fit. I commented that the coveralls seemed less bulky than the few I had seen others wearing. He said he searched a lot to find the easiest ones to use that would do the job. Ease of use adds to the safety of the work & the acceptance of using it.

    Now I just need to think of new ways to do delicate movements, such as threading locknuts, which are harder to do with heavy gloves in tight spaces. But I am creative enough to think of something. Though I am long past my youth, I can still adapt my thinking as needed. I also need to read on it, as part of my regular studies.

    No, don't get your hopes up that I will embrace AFCI breakers. That will never happen.
    Yes, I'll be happy to do a first class job for less than anyone else and take a dollar a week for 10 years.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Rutland, VT, USA
    Posts
    28
    Hello,

    Glad to hear companies and employees embracing arc flash hazard protections. I assume that this company had a study done to identify the afh and have labels placed. This would be the basis for the afh ppe choosen by the employer.

    That said two things caught my attention in your post:

    This co follows the no live work/arc flash protection rules.
    Now I just need to think of new ways to do delicate movements, such as threading locknuts, which are harder to do with heavy gloves in tight spaces. But I am creative enough to think of something.
    Based on the first quote I don't understand why you would have to tread locknuts on with heavy gloves. Since your company has a no live (energized) work rule, you would need the arc flash PPE for operating any breakers or switches and testing them de-energized. Once the circuit has been locked out tagged out and proven de-energized, the arc flash PPE is not required as the hazard has been removed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    1,545
    Quote Originally Posted by wbdvt View Post
    Hello,

    Based on the first quote I don't understand why you would have to tread locknuts on with heavy gloves. Since your company has a no live (energized) work rule, you would need the arc flash PPE for operating any breakers or switches and testing them de-energized. Once the circuit has been locked out tagged out and proven de-energized, the arc flash PPE is not required as the hazard has been removed.
    Doing lots of service work, I foresee having to pipe into a live panel sometimes when shutting down the panel is not doable for some reason. Downline of the panel it would seldom be an issue.
    Yes, I'll be happy to do a first class job for less than anyone else and take a dollar a week for 10 years.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Rutland, VT, USA
    Posts
    28
    Doing lots of service work, I foresee having to pipe into a live panel sometimes when shutting down the panel is not doable for some reason. Downline of the panel it would seldom be an issue.
    Then I would assume that your company, since you said they have a no live work policy, uses an Energized Electrical Work Permit in these cases. In this case the company has to justify that de-energizing introduces additional hazards or increased risk. Economic reasons are not valid justification for working energized but life support equipment is.

    Also what voltage are you working at? Class 0 gloves with protectors are not real heavy.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    1,545
    Quote Originally Posted by wbdvt View Post
    Then I would assume that your company, since you said they have a no live work policy, uses an Energized Electrical Work Permit in these cases. In this case the company has to justify that de-energizing introduces additional hazards or increased risk. Economic reasons are not valid justification for working energized but life support equipment is.

    Also what voltage are you working at? Class 0 gloves with protectors are not real heavy.
    208 so far.
    Yes, I'll be happy to do a first class job for less than anyone else and take a dollar a week for 10 years.

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