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Thread: Mechanical Engineer wants to learn more EE for Power Industry

  1. #1
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    Mechanical Engineer wants to learn more EE for Power Industry

    Hi all,

    I got my degree in ME, but would very much like to learn more detailed aspects of Electrical Engineering especially as it relates to power generation, transmission, and distribution. Can anyone recommend a good book or two or other resources. I've taken circuit analysis classes as part of my ME education, but we didn't get into a lot of detail of AC, 3-phase power, or a lot of practicalities in the industry.

    thanks,
    JP

  2. #2
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    Power engineering is a lot like joining the Masons. Much of it is not available to mere mortals.

    I will sell you the secret handshake and code words though so you can get in.
    Bob

  3. #3
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    winnie3:

    You need to more completely define your goals. If you really want to become an EE, then the most efficient way is to go back to a classroom school.

    If you just want some background in a specific area, then self study in a book may work.

    If your goal is to simply have some background to support your mechanical work, then you need broad concept fundamentals. For example: an ideal three phase motor with a constant amplitude rotating magnetic vector (in the real world it is pretty close) has a constant output torque, while a single phase motor has a significant pulsation to output torque. A single phase motor is like pumping a swing, and three phase motor is like a weight, a drum, and a rope.

    .

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by winnie3 View Post
    Hi all,

    I got my degree in ME, but would very much like to learn more detailed aspects of Electrical Engineering especially as it relates to power generation, transmission, and distribution. Can anyone recommend a good book or two or other resources. I've taken circuit analysis classes as part of my ME education, but we didn't get into a lot of detail of AC, 3-phase power, or a lot of practicalities in the industry.

    thanks,
    JP
    Those would be three different majors with overlapping coursework. So the theoretical courses could be obtained through online coursework, but I found that current EE graduates seriously lack practical knowledge. Cozying up to an old-salt EE who is willing to share is a good way to overcome that gap and he would also be able to guide you to specific courses to take.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    Power engineering is a lot like joining the Masons.
    Not sure I'm with you on that, becoming a Mason was far easier than learning the intricacies of rotating machines (which I've long since forgotten) .

    There are some books that will help, other than the NEC handbook. I like Practical Electrical Wiring (Richter & Hartwell); first read that when I was a teen. Also Soares Book on Grounding and Bonding (NFPA), and the American Electrician's Handbook (Hartwell, Croft, Summers), which is, um, rather dense. There's also Electrical Wiring Industriall (Herman), but I don't have that on my shelf. All of them are available used.

    None of the, of course, is a substitute for supervised experience, but I'm sure you knew that.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by weressl View Post
    Those would be three different majors with overlapping coursework. So the theoretical courses could be obtained through online coursework, but I found that current EE graduates seriously lack practical knowledge. Cozying up to an old-salt EE who is willing to share is a good way to overcome that gap and he would also be able to guide you to specific courses to take.
    Hey old geezer!
    Puting yourself for the self-appointed mentor!!!

    If so, I'll second you!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    Puting yourself for the self-appointed mentor!!!
    Actually it is part of my yearly objective for the third year.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by weressl View Post
    Actually it is part of my yearly objective for the third year.
    Understood.

  9. #9
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    I'm going to go on the Low and just say go take some C. College courses on electrical wiring.

    OR

    Even taking a prep course for State Level Electrician testing; you will get more of solving power equations then now studing about the theory or aspects of what being an EE are.
    Last edited by cadpoint; 10-20-13 at 06:12 PM.

  10. #10
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