Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29

Thread: Your PPE--some things you've changed

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    5
    Edward- I'm sorry to hear. I wish you would have read my post in completeness before responding. I'm planning on wearing protective gear, why else would I be asking about types of material, some of the better makes on the market, etc;? And trying to gain some experiential clarity on the incidences involving probe to probe arcing. Don't count me presumptuous but I just landed here on the forum and entered with knocking (signed up and posted the question).

    and may I ask what is 'copy write'?
    Last edited by amp-here; 12-27-16 at 11:06 PM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    231
    Quote Originally Posted by amp-here View Post
    --I am looking into appropriate arc rated wear for purchase. I need to get me a paper copy of the NFPA 70. Dang!! One would think, as important as the topic is someone would make the dang copies more affordable. Ouch! that hurts at $155
    NFPA 70 is the National Electrical Code. You need NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace--that's the one that covers PPE. $71.50. And you can read it online for free.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    303
    Quote Originally Posted by wtucker View Post
    NFPA 70 is the National Electrical Code. You need NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace--that's the one that covers PPE. $71.50. And you can read it online for free.
    Any suggestions for good NFPA 70E rated meter for testing that voltage is removed from 480 panels........manf, model, and cost if possible.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    201

    Meters

    Quote Originally Posted by dionysius View Post
    Any suggestions for good NFPA 70E rated meter for testing that voltage is removed from 480 panels........manf, model, and cost if possible.
    Cat III minimum. Many manufacturers make them and there are many models but it's hard to go wrong with a Fluke.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    9,955
    Something I learned just a few years ago. Hard hats have an expiry date. They have a much shorter life than I could have ever imagined.
    I can't remember the mechanism but I think it was to do with the material degrading in sunlight or something like that.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    303
    Quote Originally Posted by kentirwin View Post
    Cat III minimum. Many manufacturers make them and there are many models but it's hard to go wrong with a Fluke.
    I agree. The leads and probes are as, if not more, important than the meter itself from the standpoint of arc flash. Anybody agree/disagree with that????? In fact should not the leads/probes have an expiry date????

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    13,046
    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    Something I learned just a few years ago. Hard hats have an expiry date. They have a much shorter life than I could have ever imagined.
    I can't remember the mechanism but I think it was to do with the material degrading in sunlight or something like that.
    That's true, and even just general environmental conditions can hasten the degradation of plastic.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Rutland, VT, USA
    Posts
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    Something I learned just a few years ago. Hard hats have an expiry date. They have a much shorter life than I could have ever imagined.
    I can't remember the mechanism but I think it was to do with the material degrading in sunlight or something like that.
    Hardhats are stamped with a manufacture date but not an expiration date. Except for hardhat manufacturers pushing a 5 yr expiration there is no requirement to periodically replace. They should be stored not in direct sunlight, be painted or covered with stickers as you are supposed to flex them and examine for cracks. You also need to examine the suspension for degradation.

    What is far worst is wearing a hardhat improperly such as with the brim to the back. This not how they are tested.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    4,244
    Quote Originally Posted by amp-here View Post
    Edward- I'm sorry to hear. I wish you would have read my post in completeness before responding. I'm planning on wearing protective gear, why else would I be asking about types of material, some of the better makes on the market, etc;? And trying to gain some experiential clarity on the incidences involving probe to probe arcing. Don't count me presumptuous but I just landed here on the forum and entered with knocking (signed up and posted the question).

    and may I ask what is 'copy write'?
    Since no one answered this: copyright is ownership of intellectual property, which includes writing. The poster was alluding to copyright infringement, which is copying a work without permission. Yes, the fines can run into huge numbers, and the chances of you getting fined for copying the NEC or an NFPA book are about as good as winning the Powerball lottery. If you printed and sold 20,000 bootleg copies, sure, but one book, or one section?

    Securing power is almost always required. PPE is not an excuse to work live (not saying you do, but it is done).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P35HRYHFz7c

    taking a 50,000*F plasma shower is not on my "to do" list. as fulthrotl mentioned before, above 40cal the pressure front would probably kill you anyway.

    Most probes are rated to 600V. Fluke and others make ones rated to 1000V. Above that, you'd have to check. There is a vid on youtube of a worker who was killed using a meter rated 600V on 2300V (4160V). As soon as he touched probes line to line, an arc blast ensued via the meter and burned the man to death.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,786
    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    ...above 40cal the pressure front would probably kill you anyway.
    The blast has absolutely nothing to do with the amount of incident energy. You can be injured by an arc blast without being burned by it. Do not assume a low incident energy fault is 'tolerable' because you have AF PPE.
    Many high incident energies are due to relatively long clearing times caused by relatively low fault currents through the protective device (like on a transformer secondary, where the protection is on the primary side). The long lasting low fault current arcs can easily melt steel but they are not really explosive (similar to an arc welder).
    Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •