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Thread: FIRE! Red FPE Breakers please help!

  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Fuses very seldom fail to trip, yet are frowned upon by insurance companies.
    Shhhhh...

  2. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Fuses very seldom fail to trip, yet are frowned upon by insurance companies.
    Probably because some muppet will over-fuse the circuit, or replace the fuse with a penny.

    https://images-cdn.9gag.com/photo/a9M9BGL_700b.jpg


    SceneryDriver

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by SceneryDriver View Post
    Probably because some muppet will over-fuse the circuit...
    Why would you ever buy a 20A fuse when they make them in 30A?

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    Why would you ever buy a 20A fuse when they make them in 30A?
    I have seen many single pole 30 amp breakers installed where there should have been a 15 or 20, though not nearly as often as you see 30 amp plug fuses used where a 15 or 20 should have been used.

    Also seen 200 amp fused safety switch with door open and a fan blowing on it so fuses don't trip as often as without the fan.

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I have seen many single pole 30 amp breakers installed where there should have been a 15 or 20, though not nearly as often as you see 30 amp plug fuses used where a 15 or 20 should have been used...
    Exactly.

    The times I've seen a 30A single-pole breaker where a 20A should be is usually when someone "who knows what they are doing" put it on a receptacle serving a chop saw or something like that.

    With fuses, it's because any HO can replace a fuse, and hey, the 30 fits!

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC702 View Post
    Exactly.

    The times I've seen a 30A single-pole breaker where a 20A should be is usually when someone "who knows what they are doing" put it on a receptacle serving a chop saw or something like that.

    With fuses, it's because any HO can replace a fuse, and hey, the 30 fits!
    I wouldn't quite say they know what they are doing, they are just brave enough to change out a breaker, the 30 amp breaker also fits, sometimes even a 40 or 50 amp breaker fits where the plug fuse only is made up to 30 amps

  7. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATSman View Post
    I hope this is not too far off subject but will chance it. I do not condone this procedure for breaker trip testing since I come from a long line of breaker testing using the low voltage-high current testing procedures, but experienced this about 14 yrs ago.
    While I was doing start-up testing on the AirTrain people mover project at SFO airport I was shocked (pardon pun) to hear of the procedure that Bombardier Transportation (formally Westinghouse Transportation) was required to use to test the trip units of the Eaton DS air frame CB in the 5 double-ended substations. I think the breaker frame sizes were in the 800A range. They would clamp copper shunts (dead shorts) using vice-grip pliers across the 600V conductor rail segments that the cars were powered from. Then on a remote command from central control wound send a close command to the breaker ...and....BOOM!!! the breaker would trip!!!! We would stand behind a transformer (chicken, I guess!) to witness to operation and record the results. Yeah, never heard of this before but it was a real world way of verifying the trip unit, cable and bus connections of each circuit during a real fault condition. The breaker contacts were inspected afterwards but did not find any problems since they are designed for this.
    Has anyone ever experienced this type of testing?
    I toured the Furnas motor control plant back in the 80's where they showed us the destructive testing area, only got to watch videos, pretty cool! Only thing is the light is blinding to the camera so you only see so much carnage. I'll bet testing vids can be found on the interwebs.

  8. #78
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    The UBI breakers are ChiCom sourced, good enough reason to avoid them, FPE Stab-Loc,breakers & Zinsco/Sylvania plug in breakers have a well deserved bad reputation, rather not use replacements for them from a country that has pretty lax standards.

  9. #79
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    Aren't all of them made in 3rd world sweatshops anyways?

    ~RJ~

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by romex jockey View Post
    Aren't all of them made in 3rd world sweatshops anyways?

    ~RJ~
    QO circuit breakers are made in Lincoln, NE. I don't know where all the components are made but they are assembled in that plant. I do know the basic models are machine assembled. My college class got to tour that plant back in late 1980's. GFCI breakers were hand assembled at that time.

    From what I can tell they are still going with QO products there.

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