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Thread: College

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Raleigh, NC USA
    Posts
    340
    In my field having a PE is the be all and end all. I would make sure what ever degree you choose is ABET accredited and eligible to sit for the FE at graduation.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
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    3,830
    Quote Originally Posted by JoelP View Post
    I want to do more of the design aspect
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has an Electric Power Engineering program that is separate from its EE program. Head there to look at the courses and get a feel for what you might be in for. The school itself is pretty well regarded; the smartest girl I've ever met went there. Poke around the web for similar offerings. Note that there are a LOT of Technology programs out there so you may have to look hard. You may or may not be able to save some money by taking courses at a community college first and transferring the credits. Look very closely at what RPI or any other 4-year school will take in transfer credits. Usually the humanities stuff goes over no problem. The more specialized the technical courses get, the less they'll give credit for.

  3. #13
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    Oct 2007
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    New Jersey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saturn_Europa View Post
    In my field having a PE is the be all and end all. I would make sure what ever degree you choose is ABET accredited and eligible to sit for the FE at graduation.
    Good advice!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Stroudsburg Pa
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has an Electric Power Engineering program that is separate from its EE program. Head there to look at the courses and get a feel for what you might be in for. The school itself is pretty well regarded; the smartest girl I've ever met went there. Poke around the web for similar offerings. Note that there are a LOT of Technology programs out there so you may have to look hard. You may or may not be able to save some money by taking courses at a community college first and transferring the credits. Look very closely at what RPI or any other 4-year school will take in transfer credits. Usually the humanities stuff goes over no problem. The more specialized the technical courses get, the less they'll give credit for.
    Thank you I will look into it

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    San Francisco, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,193
    I have an EET, one negative aspect is that in some states, you cannot go for a PE license with an EET, EE only. I'm finishing up my career arc now so it doesn't really matter any more, but it would have been good about 20 years ago. I tried and was denied.
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
    Many people are shocked when they discover I am not a good electrician...

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    18,436
    Quote Originally Posted by JoelP View Post
    what is the difference between the two?
    Don't take this as an authenticated response. My understanding is that the EE program has more math and science, and the EET program has more lab work.

    Another option to consider is one that I had never encountered until I started with my present company two years ago. It is the Architectural Engineering program. My boss has that degree from Kansas State University. We have had graduates from the University of Kansas also, but they have moved on and are greatly missed. I have no idea who else offers the program. It differs from the EE and the EET in that you get a broader understanding of how buildings are designed and constructed. We had an intern last summer who was studying for an AE degree. She already knew her way around the NEC (not an expert, but who among us is?), and she understood circuiting, sizing feeders and branch circuits, and she was familiar with our phased design process (i.e., schematic design, detailed design, construction documents, construction support). I am sure that no EE or EET program gives that to a student, and that is what my company needs a design engineer to be able to do.

    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,841
    Do you ENJOY math and physics? If so EE
    if more hands on, EET

    You have some good choices in PA
    Pitt has a respected EE program with a power concentration
    PSU well regarded for electro-mech technology
    PSU Behrend Erie solid EET program

    go talk to some guys working in the field
    The PA society of PE's might be able to help



  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    PA
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    2,841
    Quote Originally Posted by charlie b View Post
    Don't take this as an authenticated response. My understanding is that the EE program has more math and science, and the EET program has more lab work.

    Another option to consider is one that I had never encountered until I started with my present company two years ago. It is the Architectural Engineering program. My boss has that degree from Kansas State University. We have had graduates from the University of Kansas also, but they have moved on and are greatly missed. I have no idea who else offers the program. It differs from the EE and the EET in that you get a broader understanding of how buildings are designed and constructed. We had an intern last summer who was studying for an AE degree. She already knew her way around the NEC (not an expert, but who among us is?), and she understood circuiting, sizing feeders and branch circuits, and she was familiar with our phased design process (i.e., schematic design, detailed design, construction documents, construction support). I am sure that no EE or EET program gives that to a student, and that is what my company needs a design engineer to be able to do.

    http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/Depa...Concentration/

    look at the power engr concentration
    cost estimating
    bulding layout
    nec stuff, sizing, etc
    they have a lab donated by eaton with xfmrs, panel boards, etc
    field trips to the ibew to work with their apprentices

    more EE programs are offering practical stuff
    ece 1700
    a lot of design firms and contrators recruit these guys (and gals)

    http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/Depa.../EE-Electives/
    Description:
    This course introduces the basics of three-wire and three phase electrical distribution for homes, retail, apartments, and light industry. Electrical fundamentals are presented and initially applied to residential wiring to demonstrate circuit construction, ratings, and protective devices. Power entranceways, protective circuit breakers, branch circuits, lighting loads, isolation devices, and safety of operation are considered. The means electrical cost estimation method and data are used. Building control and automation are introduced.





  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    26
    I had 14 years in the field when I decided I wanted a degree. I got my associate degree through the local community college, while working full-time, thinking this was the best route.
    Then I transferred to the local university (university of Houston). They accepted less than half of my credits. (that amounts to about $10k worth of credits not accepted). Spent a year there, while working part time. (they didn't offer all the classes I needed during the evening hours so I couldn't work full time) and realized I can't afford to live on part time work.
    Looked for an online EE program, completely online. That was 2 years ago but the only program I found was through Arizona state university and it was $$$.
    After some deliberation I decided to go the EET route. I found the least expensive program I could and it is still a couple dollars more per credit hour than U of H was.
    This is through Grantham university. They accepted 32 of the 67 credits I paid for and earned to get my associate degree.
    But I get to work full-time.
    I'm 11 classes away from my degree.
    It's not easy, but as quoted earlier, nothing worth a damm is.
    Short term pain for long term gain.
    I say go for it.
    Based on my research you will save money starting and finishing a program at the same institution.



    Sent from my HTC6545LVW using Tapatalk

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,841
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaneyj View Post
    I had 14 years in the field when I decided I wanted a degree. I got my associate degree through the local community college, while working full-time, thinking this was the best route.
    Then I transferred to the local university (university of Houston). They accepted less than half of my credits. (that amounts to about $10k worth of credits not accepted). Spent a year there, while working part time. (they didn't offer all the classes I needed during the evening hours so I couldn't work full time) and realized I can't afford to live on part time work.
    Looked for an online EE program, completely online. That was 2 years ago but the only program I found was through Arizona state university and it was $$$.
    After some deliberation I decided to go the EET route. I found the least expensive program I could and it is still a couple dollars more per credit hour than U of H was.
    This is through Grantham university. They accepted 32 of the 67 credits I paid for and earned to get my associate degree.
    But I get to work full-time.
    I'm 11 classes away from my degree.
    It's not easy, but as quoted earlier, nothing worth a damm is.
    Short term pain for long term gain.
    I say go for it.
    Based on my research you will save money starting and finishing a program at the same institution.



    Sent from my HTC6545LVW using Tapatalk
    sound advice

    and when you graduate you will be truly well rounded with working and theoretical understanding
    not to mention with proven drive and motivation
    a good hire



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