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Thread: College

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Katy, Texas
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    36
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingenieur View Post
    sound advice

    and when you graduate you will be truly well rounded with working and theoretical understanding
    not to mention with proven drive and motivation
    a good hire
    Thank you sir. I take that as a compliment.

    Sent from my HTC6545LVW using Tapatalk

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Stroudsburg Pa
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    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaneyj View Post
    I had 14 years in the field when I decided I wanted a degree. I got my associate degree through the local community college, while working full-time, thinking this was the best route.
    Then I transferred to the local university (university of Houston). They accepted less than half of my credits. (that amounts to about $10k worth of credits not accepted). Spent a year there, while working part time. (they didn't offer all the classes I needed during the evening hours so I couldn't work full time) and realized I can't afford to live on part time work.
    Looked for an online EE program, completely online. That was 2 years ago but the only program I found was through Arizona state university and it was $$$.
    After some deliberation I decided to go the EET route. I found the least expensive program I could and it is still a couple dollars more per credit hour than U of H was.
    This is through Grantham university. They accepted 32 of the 67 credits I paid for and earned to get my associate degree.
    But I get to work full-time.
    I'm 11 classes away from my degree.
    It's not easy, but as quoted earlier, nothing worth a damm is.
    Short term pain for long term gain.
    I say go for it.
    Based on my research you will save money starting and finishing a program at the same institution.



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    Thank you, I am going to do EE

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Katy, Texas
    Posts
    36
    Quote Originally Posted by JoelP View Post
    Thank you, I am going to do EE
    Good for you...
    If I can help-advice or questions- message me. . I'd be happy to offer what I can.
    Looking back, I didn't know enough to even have the right questions to ask...

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  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Arcata, CA
    Posts
    359
    If you can find a community college that is closely associated with the college/university you want, you may be able to get a lot of your general ed out of the way for a lot less money.

    Personally, I wanted to spread out my general ed, which was also wise because you had to start right away in the program I was in. I figured it was a good way to meet women, but then it turned out I met my (still, after 46 years) wife in a majors class.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    33,515
    Take your gen-ed classes first semester/first year, and scatter some common classes needed for either degree in there and find out what you are good with and go from there. You may even find out you are more interested in something different but still somewhat related along the way and adjust your courses accordingly. The gen-eds will be good for nearly any degree and will be out of the way sooner if you take them early on.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX, USA
    Posts
    8,483
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Take your gen-ed classes first semester/first year, and scatter some common classes needed for either degree in there and find out what you are good with and go from there. You may even find out you are more interested in something different but still somewhat related along the way and adjust your courses accordingly. The gen-eds will be good for nearly any degree and will be out of the way sooner if you take them early on.
    When I went for my EE degree I already had a BSChem, so most of my electives were already covered. That resulted in my having to carry a full load of engineering courses nearly every semester. It was... strenuous.

  7. #27
    If you plan on working be prepared to dedicate most of your time to studing. Leave yourself 4 hours of study time for every hour of class time. Some classes will take less some will take more. I do not leave the desk much less the house on weekends. Every ounce of effort you put into studing and practice pays dividends in later classes. You will see the c students from early semesters begining to struggle as they have to learn what the should have in eariler classes. The only hard thing about EE is making yourself do all the practice it takes to succeed. If you can master that you are done.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
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    33,515
    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrafault View Post
    If you plan on working be prepared to dedicate most of your time to studing. Leave yourself 4 hours of study time for every hour of class time. Some classes will take less some will take more. I do not leave the desk much less the house on weekends. Every ounce of effort you put into studing and practice pays dividends in later classes. You will see the c students from early semesters begining to struggle as they have to learn what the should have in eariler classes. The only hard thing about EE is making yourself do all the practice it takes to succeed. If you can master that you are done.
    When I was 18-24 years old I was probably smart enough to pursue an engineering degree, but definitely not disciplined enough to put that kind of effort into studying.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,737
    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrafault View Post
    If you plan on working be prepared to dedicate most of your time to studing. Leave yourself 4 hours of study time for every hour of class time. Some classes will take less some will take more. I do not leave the desk much less the house on weekends. Every ounce of effort you put into studing and practice pays dividends in later classes. You will see the c students from early semesters begining to struggle as they have to learn what the should have in eariler classes. The only hard thing about EE is making yourself do all the practice it takes to succeed. If you can master that you are done.
    Concepts are relatively easy, application is harder. My regret is not putting in the time just working example problems until I understood how to set up and apply the equations and which equations to use when. Like getting to Carnegie Hall, it takes practice, practice, practice.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX, USA
    Posts
    8,483
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    When I was 18-24 years old I was probably smart enough to pursue an engineering degree, but definitely not disciplined enough to put that kind of effort into studying.
    You're singing my song. My first time through college (BSChem) I went there straight out of high school and the 'rents paid for it. I managed to graduate, just barely, in and out of academic probation the whole time. I survived almost entirely on what I could pick up in class, when I went to class, and cramming for exams.

    My second time (BSEE) I was in my 30's with a wife and kid, and I was on my own dime. I did much better, but it took putting in many 100 hour weeks, which I would never have done before. How I even managed to get myself into engineering school given my prior poor academic performance is another story.

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