Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 42

Thread: College

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    SW PA USA
    Posts
    2,350
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Concepts are relatively easy, application is harder. My regret is not putting in the time just working example problems until I understood how to set up and apply the equations and which equations to use when. Like getting to Carnegie Hall, it takes practice, practice, practice.
    I found the opposite
    Imo the concepts and basics took the real effort
    mentally visualizing
    derivation of the basic equations like Ohms Law or Kirchhoff's from field theory was the difficult part
    but once done everything else falls in place
    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits


  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    30,083
    Quote Originally Posted by ggunn View Post
    You're singing my song. My first time through college (BSChem) I went there straight out of high school and the 'rents paid for it. I managed to graduate, just barely, in and out of academic probation the whole time. I survived almost entirely on what I could pick up in class, when I went to class, and cramming for exams.

    My second time (BSEE) I was in my 30's with a wife and kid, and I was on my own dime. I did much better, but it took putting in many 100 hour weeks, which I would never have done before. How I even managed to get myself into engineering school given my prior poor academic performance is another story.
    I think those schools know they get more dedication from nearly every student over 25 vs how many under that age will put as much effort into earning whatever degree they are after. If you are that age and even thinking of pursuing a degree you must be serious about it. Yes there are younger students that are very good students, but the majority of students are younger in the first place, nearly all the older students are there for a purpose, the younger ones are still trying to figure out what they might want to do.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern illinois
    Posts
    14,405
    Quote Originally Posted by JoelP View Post
    I want to go to college but I don't know if I should do Electrcial engineer or Electrical engineer technology
    I went EET. If I had it to do today knowing what I know today I would strongly suggest EE. Solely because there is a slow but noticeable movement to make it harder for engineers to do much of anything without a PE license and it is all but impossible to get a PE license with just an EET degree. The curriculum is not a lot harder academically, although I think EE is more rounded in various engineering areas outside of electricity.

    The significant difference appears to me to be that EE degrees typically require an extra semester or two of math, some ME classes, and some chemistry classes. The physics is about the same although EE usually goes at it from a calculus basis rather than the algebraic basis in EET curriculums.

    If you can handle calculus, which is required in both EE and EET you should not have any real problems with any of these other classes, even if you might not enjoy them as much.

    EE degrees also seem to have a lot more fluff to them. This is to make the coursework more profitable to the school. They can have a TA teach fluff classes to 100 kids at a time and charge the same tuition as if a real instructor was teaching 20 kids an actual engineering course.

    If you go EE, take the EIT test after taking the review class while you are still in school. It will make it a lot easier to pass and you have to pass it to become a PE. Think of it as one of the merit badges you need, sort of like becoming an Eagle Scout.
    Bob

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    30,083
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    EE degrees also seem to have a lot more fluff to them. This is to make the coursework more profitable to the school. They can have a TA teach fluff classes to 100 kids at a time and charge the same tuition as if a real instructor was teaching 20 kids an actual engineering course.
    People sometimes forget these colleges are in business to earn money just like many other businesses.

    Don't be completely fooled by "State" or "Non profit" schools either, they still have to compete with the others and play some of the same games, they just need to justify their expenses to their boards and regulators.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,631
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    ... I think EE is more rounded in various engineering areas outside of electricity.
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    ...EE degrees also seem to have a lot more fluff to them.
    The lack of non-technical courses (is that your fluff?), is often a big stumbling block for EETs and foreign school EEs, when it comes to getting their PE.
    Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX, USA
    Posts
    7,057
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I think those schools know they get more dedication from nearly every student over 25 vs how many under that age will put as much effort into earning whatever degree they are after. If you are that age and even thinking of pursuing a degree you must be serious about it. Yes there are younger students that are very good students, but the majority of students are younger in the first place, nearly all the older students are there for a purpose, the younger ones are still trying to figure out what they might want to do.
    This is true; at least it was in my case. My first time through I was there for the wrong reasons, which were to enjoy the social life and to stay out of the war in Viet Nam. School was a sideline and I had no idea what good the degree I was sort of pursuing would do me when I got out.

    My second time through I looked at it as vocational training. My social life consisted solely of Quality Time with my wife and daughter between getting out of class on Friday afternoons and heading to the library on Saturday afternoons. Sundays were prep days for the week ahead. I left the house Monday through Friday at 7AM and got home after 7PM (sometimes a lot after) Monday through Thursday. It was the hardest thing I ever did, but it was worth it.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    3,568
    Quote Originally Posted by ggunn View Post
    This is true; at least it was in my case. My first time through I was there for the wrong reasons, which were to enjoy the social life and to stay out of the war in Viet Nam. School was a sideline and I had no idea what good the degree I was sort of pursuing would do me when I got out.

    My second time through I looked at it as vocational training. My social life consisted solely of Quality Time with my wife and daughter between getting out of class on Friday afternoons and heading to the library on Saturday afternoons. Sundays were prep days for the week ahead. I left the house Monday through Friday at 7AM and got home after 7PM (sometimes a lot after) Monday through Thursday. It was the hardest thing I ever did, but it was worth it.
    Sir, I salute your self-discipline. I am pretty sure under similar circumstances I would not be able to do that grind.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    SW PA USA
    Posts
    2,350
    I'm in grad school now
    I have to put more into it but am getting more out of it
    work/school is a tough act to balance
    1 course/term
    still demanding
    Lecture 3 hours
    hw 4-6 hrs easy
    travel another 2
    10 hrs/week
    can't imagine 2 or 3 courses
    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits


  9. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX, USA
    Posts
    7,057
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Sir, I salute your self-discipline. I am pretty sure under similar circumstances I would not be able to do that grind.
    Nothing worth a damn comes easy.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Dublin, GA
    Posts
    60
    Lots of great comments, so I'll add a few based on 50+ years. The engineering program at any major university will be almost all theory, meaning a lot of high-level math and theory related to many of the various electrical engineering fields. After all, they only have so much time and neither you or they know whether you will end up designing computer chips or cell tower antennas, just to name two possibilities. For sure, you are not likely to see any courses about codes, motor control circuits, etc. For me, the best combination was a co-op program at a great university so that I ended up with a therotical understanding, along with some really good practical connections to the real world via my industrial job.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •