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Thread: What Would You Do?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    959
    I would expect if it were the buyer's HI, they would use the contractor's repair estimate to only demand a deduct at the closing. Then money may be tight and they may forget about it after the closing.

    With the seller and the HI report, I would expect they would be more inclined to have it fixed instead of giving the credit to the buyer. But some sellers may generally be afraid of, or unsure of, hiring contractors themselves and prefer to let the buyer handle it by agreement so they do not have to touch it.

    Either way it presents a high probability of an inspecting contractor not doing the work. Business is about doing what the customer wants done.

    Seen it go both ways. Changed a service for the seller on the HI's report (some tiny ancient overpriced old POC home). At the end of the day reconnected power to the boiler and it ran ran ran without stopping as I finished up.

    So I checked it and immediately saw it was some obsolete antique from like the 1930's, steam when it should have been hydronic, saw it was missing a few current code safeties like a high limit and LWCO. It was obvious the boiler was a yank and replace. So I cut power to it so I could leave it safely overnight and wrote the deficiency email immediately that day (unoccupied estate sale house).

    Got a call the next day they're crying, the house is cold and I had broken the boiler. They had not seen my email. But in discussion they did say they were surprised when they saw how fast it could gobble oil.

    Turns out the HI had also seen the boiler and recommended the seller provide a special insurance policy just for the boiler that it would run for one year, at a cost of $500. Not a credit of $500, an added expense of $500.

    I had listed code deficiencies and strongly recommended they were crazy to pay the $500 for added insurance. The boiler should come out for $5000 or the smart way to do it would be a steam to hydronic conversion. They needed a new heating system.
    Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    New Jersey
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    3,196
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Does current owner even need to correct these deficiencies? It may be a bargaining tool for potential buyer and they end up buying it as is, with the option to correct those deficiencies if they wish after they purchase the home.
    Sometimes that works but most of the real estate agents I associate with hate using that approach. They're looking to make a sale and don't want any issues in their way. Potential buyers generally want to see results and not bargain for a handyman special.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldstar View Post
    Sometimes that works but most of the real estate agents I associate with hate using that approach. They're looking to make a sale and don't want any issues in their way. Potential buyers generally want to see results and not bargain for a handyman special.
    And if they could have their way the HI would always give a good report.

    Bottom line is HI is nothing but a report on conditions of the home. It is up to the buyer and seller to agree on a sale price, and taking the HI report into consideration when making/accepting offers. No different then asking a mechanic to look at a used car before you commit to purchasing it, if he finds something to be concerned about you can either ask the seller to fix it, reduce the price, or come to some other agreement.

    With the house or the car the seller may just decide to reduce the price if they really want to get rid of it, if they are set on getting a certain price they may wait a long time to find the right seller if they don't fix the deficiency. Realtor I'm guessing also would rather take a reduced sale now then wait for that right buyer in most instances. They generally don't make money if houses are not selling at all.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Las Vegas
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    384
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Does current owner even need to correct these deficiencies? It may be a bargaining tool for potential buyer and they end up buying it as is, with the option to correct those deficiencies if they wish after they purchase the home.
    Exactly.
    Don't count on getting the work.
    It may only used for negotiations.
    The HO informed more repairs needed and safety issues need to be disclosed to the buyer.
    But that's the HOs problem.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Windsor, CO NEC: 2017
    Posts
    16,064
    I think if I were to stop and look maybe 10% of realtor bids resulted in actually doing the work. One noteworthy instance did generate a realtor calling me in hysterics for detailing the deficiencies in the wiring at the service and panel, and what it would cost to fix it. I was under the impression that's why I was there...

    ...that was likely one of the most awkward calls I have ever had.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SF CA USA
    Posts
    609
    people have mixed feelings about detailed deficiency reports.

    "obfuscate to sell, simplify to do"

    I have a big commercial job done by a big name company with so many deficiencies
    skyscraper hot shots - "out of my walker duct!"

    the foreman told me "Temp work is the most hazardous thing we do"
    but the temp work becomes permanent
    he has 480v temp heaters on so cord out on a big office floor with unqualified operators [engineers with umbrellas to dry =)]

    480v 3phase 30kw heaters on 150 foot extension cords - no line of sight - run thru cable ramps - double lugged and overfused with 100a fuses & #6 wire
    questions about the disco for the xfmr & 25' tap rule xfr switches- he had no idea that to consider installing a xfr switch he would have to open one of the main distrib because the xfmr feed was lugged to the 400a buss
    then the little things - hot work permit, working clearances, exposed flex, heaven forbid grounding bushings or a green wire
    The list is very long.

    In my old job I was the AHJ, along with my boss, but at this job...
    the customer has mixed feelings, in one way he can see it is not safe and that I am right,
    on the other hand, the other guy is cheaper and tells him "don't worry, I'll make it safe"
    ie he'll strap the so cord to the wall arrrgghh!
    "A problem clearly stated is a problem half solved."

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
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    30,398
    When I occasionally get called to inspect a home that is for sale I detail the deficiencies as well.

    Most of these people seem to think you are going to just tell them everything is alright. If they question why I detailed it - I tell them I have a reference of what I observed and told the party requesting the inspection. If I just tell you everything is ok and the place burns down afterward or someone gets electrocuted and someone finds a problem in the wiring was the cause, then they are going to come after me wondering why I said it was ok. I also make notes of things that are violations of codes today but may have been compliant at the time of installation.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Valdosta, GA
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    3,588
    Wouldn't it be far less costly to put a QOM2100VH main breaker in, and leave it up to the buyer to upgrade the meter if they wish?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
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    Quote Originally Posted by brantmacga View Post
    Wouldn't it be far less costly to put a QOM2100VH main breaker in, and leave it up to the buyer to upgrade the meter if they wish?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Very possible.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
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    3,196
    Quote Originally Posted by brantmacga View Post
    Wouldn't it be far less costly to put a QOM2100VH main breaker in, and leave it up to the buyer to upgrade the meter if they wish?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    You're probably right. Aside from the Code violations that already exist would I be making the matter worse by replacing the main ?

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