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Thread: Definition Of Conductors

  1. #1
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    Definition Of Conductors

    Good Afternoon Everyone,

    I am having a friendly debate with an electrical counterpart regarding what the conductors on the attached are defined as. What we have is a 1/4" x 4" continuous copper bar around the perimeter of the substation room and from that copper bar we have 4/0 conductors to the associated substations. I am trying to keep my question as vague as I can, so as not to influence anyone's answer.

    Your assistance is appreciated.

    Thank you.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnt8197 View Post
    Good Afternoon Everyone,

    I am having a friendly debate with an electrical counterpart regarding what the conductors on the attached are defined as. What we have is a 1/4" x 4" continuous copper bar around the perimeter of the substation room and from that copper bar we have 4/0 conductors to the associated substations. I am trying to keep my question as vague as I can, so as not to influence anyone's answer.

    Your assistance is appreciated.

    Thank you.
    I don't understand the question. Is this a feeder vs. branch circuit thing question?
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  3. #3
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    My apologies, the copper bar around the substation room is a ground bar and this is the main point the system. Hope this clarifies.

    Thank you

  4. #4
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    Here is the full drawing of the area. I was trying not to show this so as not to influence anyone's answers.

    Thank you again.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnt8197 View Post
    My apologies, the copper bar around the substation room is a ground bar and this is the main point the system. Hope this clarifies.

    Thank you
    I will go with EGC.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  6. #6
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    Bonding Conductor or Jumper. A reliable conductor to
    ensure the required electrical conductivity between metal
    parts required to be electrically connected.
    .........

  7. #7
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    I would call them grounding electrode conductor's

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnt8197 View Post
    Good Afternoon Everyone,

    I am having a friendly debate with an electrical counterpart regarding what the conductors on the attached are defined as. What we have is a 1/4" x 4" continuous copper bar around the perimeter of the substation room and from that copper bar we have 4/0 conductors to the associated substations. I am trying to keep my question as vague as I can, so as not to influence anyone's answer.

    Your assistance is appreciated.

    Thank you.
    I'm not sure what the official term would be if there is one, but I consider it a supplemental EGC. (off subject a bit, I've been on this rant for awhile) The gas and oil industry seems to like supplemental grounding, including ground rings in the earth, connected to every metallic object in a plant including a metallic MCC/PDC building. I understand the importance of grounding and bonding, but in a building with switch-gear, etc. already grounded per NEC, this supplemental grounding system adds a parallel path for fault currents which doesn't follow the supply conductors, which seems to me to be a negative. The NEC has been altered over the years for instance to make sure this doesn't happen on SDSs, etc. Thoughts? If this should be a new thread, I understand.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim1959 View Post
    I'm not sure what the official term would be if there is one, but I consider it a supplemental EGC. (off subject a bit, I've been on this rant for awhile) The gas and oil industry seems to like supplemental grounding, including ground rings in the earth, connected to every metallic object in a plant including a metallic MCC/PDC building. I understand the importance of grounding and bonding, but in a building with switch-gear, etc. already grounded per NEC, this supplemental grounding system adds a parallel path for fault currents which doesn't follow the supply conductors, which seems to me to be a negative. The NEC has been altered over the years for instance to make sure this doesn't happen on SDSs, etc. Thoughts? If this should be a new thread, I understand.
    I've done a lot of work on cell sites and they have a similar earthing scheme, along with everything, and I mean every single cotton picking thing, metal having a copper bonding jumper above and beyond the normal EGC back to a big copper buss. I don't see any problem with it.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwire View Post
    .........
    Why would you consider this a bonding jumper in lieu of a grounding conductor? The conductors are going from the main grounding bus bar to the downstream portion of the unit substations? Wouldn't that be the main grounding conductor for the separately derived system?

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