Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Working Part Time

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Tampa, FL, USA
    Posts
    975
    Hmm, I didn't think about part-time being 2 or 3 full days. Not sure why. I think that increases your chances of getting work. Some small employers would be interested in a j-man with that schedule.

    Quote Originally Posted by GLSA View Post
    What advice can you guys give about the reason I want to go to part time to the contractor?
    "I want to go back to school" should be enough. Don't volunteer any health related info unless it's a legitimate question on an employment app.

    Quote Originally Posted by GLSA View Post
    I would take less money to have more flexibility
    Don't take less money. If you have J-man skills, you should get J-man pay regardless of scheduling.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from winged horses.
    Posts
    8,747
    Quote Originally Posted by Coppersmith View Post
    Hmm, I didn't think about part-time being 2 or 3 full days. Not sure why. I think that increases your chances of getting work. Some small employers would be interested in a j-man with that schedule.



    "I want to go back to school" should be enough. Don't volunteer any health related info unless it's a legitimate question on an employment app.



    Don't take less money. If you have J-man skills, you should get J-man pay regardless of scheduling.
    I agree with all of this. I work for a small shop and we would gladly take a competent journeyman on part time.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    304
    I'd definitely be interested in taking someone on part time, but I'd have a hard time giving them a van full of tools and parts that I'm paying for full time. I've had part time apprentices, but I see some logistical problems with a part time J-man. I'd probably look at them being more of a "super apprentice" where I'd send them out to help on a job where there would already be another full time J-man with a van on site.

    For that reason, I'd have to consider the wage I'd pay. Do I pay what I would pay a FT J-man looking at the lack of benefits being the cut for the PT status? Or do I actually pay them less than that, but more than an apprentice? I guess it would depend on how useful they would be to me at the time.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    4,244
    I've worked for quite a few outfits where a part-time or job-specific extra labor would be a huge plus. I've worked as such for a few. The problem on my end is getting no regular work nor much/any heads-up for upcoming work. If you could find a large enough shop where they need help in house a few days a week because someone full time has a medical problem or is partially retiring and wants to go from full to part time, that seems to me your best bet.

    If you could do work that doesnt require immediate/precise scheduling, like generator semi-annual PMs/checks, that may be your way to part time that works for the employer as well.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    8,854
    Set hours every day is okay if you can provide your own transportation to anywhere in a 4 county area, otherwise full days would be best for us. Yes, I would hire part time, knowledgeable, experienced help.
    Tom
    TBLO

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    33,421
    I'd hire a part time person also. Preferably one that wants to work most/all of a day but only a couple days or so a week versus someone that wants just 2 or 3 hours a day. Hourly rate would likely be higher then for same person working full time with benefits.

    I did exactly that when I was in college with my first EC employer. I went to a two year school, worked for an EC the summer between, that second year I worked every Friday (had no classes on Friday's) and most any other days when there was no classes scheduled, spring break - was a full week of work instead of going to some beach in Florida. Semester break also was spent working nearly full time.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    977
    Quote Originally Posted by GLSA View Post
    What advice can you guys give about the reason I want to go to part time to the contractor? I do want to go back to school but the main reason I am leaving the trade is for health reasons. I can perform in the trade now but I fear if my health gets any worse that I will become useless and just get fired or a laid off constantly.

    I would like to be upfront but at the same time I feel if I am then a contractor would definitely pass me up.

    As far as the schedule goes I would take less money to have more flexibility on my end but I wouldn't mind working out somewhat of a set schedule each semester so the contractor could count on me being there.
    The high in demand, hard to fill job is electrician with PLC and automation experience. That's the reason you would want to give for making the move. Look at any plant in the area doing production output and they're running some kind of automation. That's where your target employer would be. There is a race to the top to compete. Stunning improvements in the underlying technology makes automation possible that was not possible 20 or so years ago. It is just going to keep growing.

    Regular electrical, the opposite may be true, there is a race to the bottom. Labor is in surplus relative to demand, and the surplus labor is being marshalled by the temp companies, rather than EC's as it would have been 20 years ago.

    So, instead of working for an EC, someone who knows electrical at a high level, you may be working for some idiot temp agency scheduler who could not pick a fuse out of a box of copper pipe fittings if his life depended on it.

    Look for some in house job with the employer, usually maintenance or facilities management, who has, and especially is, making a great investment in automation. Then they will want someone to just become familiar with the programming in order to diagnose and repair the process. Some of those are Homer Simpson jobs, sit in front of the big red button and wait for the nuke plant to start melting, and some are ... the employers run short staffed and electrician is also mechanic, general labor, operator, all at a lower than professional level.

    Electrician only, no bargaining power. Electrician with PLC, you would have the option of quitting and taking another open spot, your prior spot would be hard to fill. They usually run those first and second shift equally.

    For school, imo programming is where the demand and the money is.
    Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    33,421
    Quote Originally Posted by __dan View Post
    The high in demand, hard to fill job is electrician with PLC and automation experience. That's the reason you would want to give for making the move. Look at any plant in the area doing production output and they're running some kind of automation. That's where your target employer would be. There is a race to the top to compete. Stunning improvements in the underlying technology makes automation possible that was not possible 20 or so years ago. It is just going to keep growing.

    Regular electrical, the opposite may be true, there is a race to the bottom. Labor is in surplus relative to demand, and the surplus labor is being marshalled by the temp companies, rather than EC's as it would have been 20 years ago.

    So, instead of working for an EC, someone who knows electrical at a high level, you may be working for some idiot temp agency scheduler who could not pick a fuse out of a box of copper pipe fittings if his life depended on it.

    Look for some in house job with the employer, usually maintenance or facilities management, who has, and especially is, making a great investment in automation. Then they will want someone to just become familiar with the programming in order to diagnose and repair the process. Some of those are Homer Simpson jobs, sit in front of the big red button and wait for the nuke plant to start melting, and some are ... the employers run short staffed and electrician is also mechanic, general labor, operator, all at a lower than professional level.

    Electrician only, no bargaining power. Electrician with PLC, you would have the option of quitting and taking another open spot, your prior spot would be hard to fill. They usually run those first and second shift equally.

    For school, imo programming is where the demand and the money is.
    I agree but will add that some of what you mentioned is also outsourced to the manufacturers/vendors of the equipment involved, especially while it is still new and under warranty. It is the second hand equipment that gets purchased by a little smaller plant that may need someone that knows how to work on it, which will also be when it is getting worn out enough that you will need a good troubleshooter to work on it. That warranty period probably only has a period of getting the bugs worked out and an occasional component failure that wasn't all that expected, past that everything becomes a bigger possibility of contributing to problems.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •