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Thread: Scissor lifts and using a harness ???

  1. #11
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    Jul 2003
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    New Jersey
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    I work on scissor lifts quite often, sometimes for months at a time and find the harness thing stupid. I will not wear one unless it's forced upon me by someone who's enforcing insurance regulations that have little to do with actual safety. If OSHA says that a harness is not required for a scissor lift that's good enough for me, when did the insurance companies take over the construction industry?
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    It is not like it is a major hassle to wear your harness while on a lift.
    And you know this from your years of lift experience?

    It is a huge pain in the neck, take it from someone that can spend 40 hours a week on one for weeks at a time.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    I work on scissor lifts quite often, sometimes for months at a time
    Exactly, it's not like once in a while. Depending on the asigment it can be a long period

  4. #14
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    Dec 2013
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    salt lake city, UT USA
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    My employer's policy is that we have to wear a harness if the lift has a tie-off point. Same with the other large EC's around here. I have noticed that when we get lifts delivered to the jobsite the delivery driver usually dons a harness just to unload it.

  5. #15
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    Aug 2004
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    might be a regional thing too. once one company in an area starts doing things it sometimes prompts others to do it as well.
    Bob

  6. #16
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    Jul 2006
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    San Francisco, CA, USA
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    I did a lot of catwalk work on cranes at Boeing, we were not required to tether up as long as we were inside of the rails, but on or above the rails, yes. Scissors lifts did not require being tethered, but were limited to 10 or 12ft extension (IIRC). JLGs though were 100% tethered. I was test driving a bridge crane once and hit a guy in a JLG when he was 120ft up in the air (I couldn't see him from my carrier carriage, he was not supposed to be there during testing). The JLG teetered and wobbled but didn't fall over (lucky for him) but it did toss him out (unlucky). His harness saved him but he hung there for an hour or so until the Fire Dept. ladder truck with a long enough ladder got to him. I was right there with him the whole time, but they would not allow me to attempt to pull him into the crane carrier with me.

    Paperwork on that cost me two days of work, although, I was billing them by the hour...
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  7. #17
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    I'm surprised he didn't have serious suspension trauma after hanging in a fall arrest harness for an hour.

    It's often really important to rescue someone quickly for that reason; those harnesses are not designed to leave people dangling.

  8. #18
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    Jul 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by big john View Post
    I'm surprised he didn't have serious suspension trauma after hanging in a fall arrest harness for an hour.

    It's often really important to rescue someone quickly for that reason; those harnesses are not designed to leave people dangling.
    He wasn't in good shape when they finally got him down. The problem was that he was at a height that required special equipment. I have no idea why they didn't just lower the JLG, but they were adamant that I not try to help him either so I assume it was a procedural thing. I had already helped get him upright and holding onto my carrier cage before they called me on the radio to tell me to stop, so at least he was somewhat upright and it was kind of like he was sitting in a bos'ns chair. But yeah, he was miserable and scared to the point of shaking so I think he was in shock. I think he wet himself too, I probably would have.
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  9. #19
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    Sep 2003
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    Connecticut
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    Part of the reason they do that is because they assume that people on scissors lifts, sooner or later, will climb on the guardrails to get extra height. If guardrails are the primary fall protection, users lose that protection when they climb on the guardrails.

    The other part is that manufacturers are now adding fall protection anchorages to scissors lifts and recommending that users wear personal fall protection. I think there's something about personal fall protection in the current ANSI standard (a voluntary standard) on scissors lifts.

  10. #20
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    Oct 2013
    Location
    newburgh,ny
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    Just went thru training

    I just went thru sissors lift training, and the same questions were asked.

    Answers
    If the lift has tie points you must use them.
    If the lift don't it is grandfathered in.
    If your body leaves the plain of the lift, example reaching over the side you need them.

    This was a OSHA certification class.

    I don't want to be strapped in a sissors lift when moving, if it gets hit or falls over I want that last chance to grab something and not have the lift drag me down with it.

    Cowboy
    A cowboy may get thrown , but they always get up and walk forward.

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