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Thread: Some one please explain the dangers in this practice

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBoone View Post
    If a frame has 120v on it wouldn't a person get shocked just by touching the frame while standing on the floor/ground?
    Kwired was talking about a wood floor, you would be isolated.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwire View Post
    Kwired was talking about a wood floor, you would be isolated.

    I have been standing on wood before, just the other day actually, and got tingled by 120v. It wasn't very bad but enough to get my attention. I always thought that wood isn't a perfect insulator so even standing on a wood floor on the second story of a house a person could feel a 120v shock.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBoone View Post
    I have been standing on wood before, just the other day actually, and got tingled by 120v. It wasn't very bad but enough to get my attention. I always thought that wood isn't a perfect insulator so even standing on a wood floor on the second story of a house a person could feel a 120v shock.
    How do you solve this?
    Tom
    TBLO

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBoone View Post
    I have been standing on wood before, just the other day actually, and got tingled by 120v. It wasn't very bad but enough to get my attention. I always thought that wood isn't a perfect insulator so even standing on a wood floor on the second story of a house a person could feel a 120v shock.
    In theory you can feel a slight shock just from capacitive current if the voltage is high enough. You make a pretty good small value capacitor just standing in free space.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBoone View Post
    I have been standing on wood before, just the other day actually, and got tingled by 120v. It wasn't very bad but enough to get my attention. I always thought that wood isn't a perfect insulator so even standing on a wood floor on the second story of a house a person could feel a 120v shock.
    Connect an ammeter in series with the ungrounded conductor and place the other probe into the wood. You likely don't even read anything in the milliamp range in old dry wood. New construction lumber, maybe you will get some current, new lumber still has a fair amount of moisture in it.

    I have grabbed live conductors many times in older installations that have no EGC, you only get shocked if you are also in contact with a grounded object. Have touched live conductors while working on top of wood poles, same thing, that one is riskier though if you have grounded objects on the pole or bare grounded conductors in the vicinity. Of course today's safety standards discourage any of that, but just saying the risk is pretty low when there is nothing grounded in the vicinity to contact simultaneously.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Connect an ammeter in series with the ungrounded conductor and place the other probe into the wood. You likely don't even read anything in the milliamp range in old dry wood. New construction lumber, maybe you will get some current, new lumber still has a fair amount of moisture in it.

    I have grabbed live conductors many times in older installations that have no EGC, you only get shocked if you are also in contact with a grounded object. Have touched live conductors while working on top of wood poles, same thing, that one is riskier though if you have grounded objects on the pole or bare grounded conductors in the vicinity. Of course today's safety standards discourage any of that, but just saying the risk is pretty low when there is nothing grounded in the vicinity to contact simultaneously.


  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Connect an ammeter in series with the ungrounded conductor and place the other probe into the wood. You likely don't even read anything in the milliamp range in old dry wood. New construction lumber, maybe you will get some current, new lumber still has a fair amount of moisture in it.

    I have grabbed live conductors many times in older installations that have no EGC, you only get shocked if you are also in contact with a grounded object. Have touched live conductors while working on top of wood poles, same thing, that one is riskier though if you have grounded objects on the pole or bare grounded conductors in the vicinity. Of course today's safety standards discourage any of that, but just saying the risk is pretty low when there is nothing grounded in the vicinity to contact simultaneously.
    Murphy's Law dictates there will always be something grounded in the immediate vicinity, like ductwork, the ground, building steel, etc, and you will be sweaty whilst touching it.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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