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Thread: 575 V to 480 v transformer help requestedI would like to as

  1. #1
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    575 V to 480 v transformer help requestedI would like to as

    I would like to ask help ....I have a 10kw forced air heater that is built in 2015(never used)
    and it is 575 volt 3phase 60 hertz set up for use in Canada ....Question : is there a transformer available that can transformer this heater so it can be installed in a building that is wired for only 480 - 3 pass 60 hertz?
    if so can you elaborate on how this transformer works and an educated guess of the cost of such a transformer? And any ideas where or buy or obtain one?
    controls on this heater are 120 volt
    company (mfr) says can't be hooked up to 480volt
    has 1/4 HP electric motor rated 575v
    all responses greatly appreciated
    thx
    marcus





  2. #2
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    Mfg/model/pn please
    data sheet

    it is a resistance heater with a fan?

    if the controls are 120 you may only need a small xfmr for the motor
    odd voltage, may be cheaper to get a 120 1/4 hp motor, pretty cheap

    I can see no reason the heating elements can't be hooked up 480 at a reduced output ~70%
    fusing will need adjusted

    be aware listings may be violated

    a 20% boost xfmr may be simpler
    Last edited by Ingenieur; 03-18-17 at 05:00 PM.



  3. #3
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    The heater wouldn't mind running at 480v but it runs at 2/3 power. Some motors like ceiling fan and multi-speed air handlers are meant to take lower voltage to slow down by increasing the slip.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric-Light View Post
    The heater wouldn't mind running at 480v but it runs at 2/3 power. Some motors like ceiling fan and multi-speed air handlers are meant to take lower voltage to slow down by increasing the slip.
    If it is a PSC or shaded pole motor it probably would be fine, heater won't put out as much heat and it wouldn't need as much air over the elements to keep them from overheating, that leaves us with getting the 120 volt controls at the correct voltage so we don't burn out contactor/relay coils from overvoltage.

    I come up with about 6.8 kw if run at 480 volts. A little more then your 2/3, a little less then Ingenieur's 70%.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    If it is a PSC or shaded pole motor it probably would be fine, heater won't put out as much heat and it wouldn't need as much air over the elements to keep them from overheating, that leaves us with getting the 120 volt controls at the correct voltage so we don't burn out contactor/relay coils from overvoltage.

    I come up with about 6.8 kw if run at 480 volts. A little more then your 2/3, a little less then Ingenieur's 70%.
    You mean undervoltage. 64% to be exact. 2/3 is close enough. 575 is 600 nominal. The control transformer has to be replaced if it doesn't have a tap for 480v input

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric-Light View Post
    You mean undervoltage. 64% to be exact. 2/3 is close enough. 575 is 600 nominal. The control transformer has to be replaced if it doesn't have a tap for 480v input
    Oops, undervoltage was correct. And I guess nominal vs actual does throw things off a little.

  7. #7
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    The way I see it, you have two options. Both may cost about the same in the end.

    1. Get a boost transformer. The downsides I see with going this route are: A). The transformer will be getting expensive by the time you get one rated for the heater's kW rating. B). You may find it difficult to find AC technicians who are willing to service the unit because it is foreign to them. C). Spare parts may be more difficult to obtain if the unit needs service in the future. And it will eventually need to be serviced, this is virtually guaranteed.

    2. Sell the unit and use the funds towards a unit which is rated for your available power. This is the simplest solution and you take all the potential problems I listed above out of the equation.

    I would go with option 2, but that's just me.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by no1uknow View Post
    The way I see it, you have two options. Both may cost about the same in the end.

    1. Get a boost transformer. The downsides I see with going this route are: A). The transformer will be getting expensive by the time you get one rated for the heater's kW rating. B). You may find it difficult to find AC technicians who are willing to service the unit because it is foreign to them. C). Spare parts may be more difficult to obtain if the unit needs service in the future. And it will eventually need to be serviced, this is virtually guaranteed.

    2. Sell the unit and use the funds towards a unit which is rated for your available power. This is the simplest solution and you take all the potential problems I listed above out of the equation.

    I would go with option 2, but that's just me.
    I kind of agree, might cost about as much to do any kind of conversion as it would to just purchase a 480 volt heater, then you do have possible difficulty getting 600 volt parts for it when things break down the road.

  9. #9
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    (480/575)^2 = 0.697 or ~70% or 7 kw
    ???

    it is rated at 575 / 10 kw
    P = v^2 / R
    take the ratios and R cancels (it is a constant)



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Youth444 View Post
    I would like to ask help ....I have a 10kw forced air heater that is built in 2015(never used)
    and it is 575 volt 3phase 60 hertz set up for use in Canada ....Question : is there a transformer available that can transformer this heater so it can be installed in a building that is wired for only 480 - 3 pass 60 hertz?
    if so can you elaborate on how this transformer works and an educated guess of the cost of such a transformer? And any ideas where or buy or obtain one?
    controls on this heater are 120 volt
    company (mfr) says can't be hooked up to 480volt
    has 1/4 HP electric motor rated 575v
    all responses greatly appreciated
    thx
    marcus
    I suppose the short answer is yes.You can transform any voltage to any other and you don't have the complication of different frequencies. Stepping up from 480V to 575V isn't a problem. Whether you can find a standard off the shelf unit may be another matter. But, even if you can't, there are transformer manufacturers who will quote one for you.

    If the heater is self contained it is possible/probable that the 120V controls are powered by a transformer within the unit.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

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