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Thread: Disconnect 30Amp Above Panel

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie b View Post
    Although I don't disagree in principle with that viewpoint, I don't think the words in the code support it. One electrical component can be "foreign" to a panel. If the intent of this article is to keep space above a panel reserved for future conduits, then a fused disconnect above a panel (such as shown in the thread) will block the future installation of conduits. Does that violate the rule? I would say this is open to debate.

    I can bend all conduits out of the way in MUCH less than 6 ft above a piece of equipment. I would think that 2 or 3 ft would be enough for this, if that is the intent.

  2. #12
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    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carultch View Post
    I can bend all conduits out of the way in MUCH less than 6 ft above a piece of equipment. I would think that 2 or 3 ft would be enough for this, if that is the intent.
    Not saying it can't be done, but several 4 inch conduits does become more of a challenge then a bunch of 1/2" to 1" conduits in that situation.

  3. #13
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    Dec 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie b View Post
    Let's be precise here. Not quite. The words are that the space is "dedicated to the electrical installation." That last word is the reason I think this is subject to debate. One could say that the "electrical installation" is anything and everything in the building that the electrician would install, from the service disconnect to the most remote receptacle. One could instead say that the subject under discussion is the switchgear, switchboard, MCC, or panelboard for which we are reserving the dedicated space. That would lead to the point of view that the phrase "electrical installation" refers to that component and only the other things that are directly associated with that component.

    It is a precision matter. That switch is not associated with the panel, even though it does have a short raceway between the two? Maybe there is supplementary fuses in there because some equipment calls for fuses and not circuit breakers? Though I would probably put the fused disconnect closer to the load. If it is for that heater in the picture---IDK. Probably would still place it elsewhere myself, but not sure I would call it a violation if I were the EI.

    Add: How many times do you see a receptacle (any rating, but most common a 5-15 or 5-20) nippled to just below a panelboard? Is every one of them a violation of the space dedicated to the panelboard or associated items?

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