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Thread: What am I missing... Romex not outside?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    What am I missing... Romex not outside?

    This may be the dumbest thing I have ever asked on here....please keep your ridicule to yourselves...

    334 states NM cable is not allowed in damp or wet locations... How is it, then, that we run it in bathrooms, kitchens, and for outside lighting and recepts?

    I was told that a run I had running across an attic, I was going to put the romex in emt and down the side of the house to the panel, had to mount a box and put THHN in the pipe be cuz romex was not allowed outside (wet/damp locations)..

    I'm just not sure what I am missing here. It is clearly something though...

    Thank you all....

  2. #2
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    NM running in walls is not in a damp area.
    NM running exposed outside but protected from direct rain etc. may be considered a dry area.
    But, because of condensation, the inside of a raceway exposed to temperature changes outdoors is considered to be wet.

    mobile

  3. #3
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    If your kitchen or bathroom is a damp or wet location you either just had your roof ripped off by a tornado or you are living in some kind of non traditional housing.

    The inside of an exterior raceway is defined as a wet location by the NEC no matter how dry it is so that is a lot easier to nail down.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  4. #4
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    It does not sound reasonable but the interior of the conduit mounted on the outsde wall of the building is wet/damp location.
    You may debate that NM cable is ok to be subject to some dampness but.... it is not worth the trouble.
    Edward
    Education is a progressive discovery of our ignorance.


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    If your kitchen or bathroom is a damp or wet location you either just had your roof ripped off by a tornado or you are living in some kind of non traditional housing.

    The inside of an exterior raceway is defined as a wet location by the NEC no matter how dry it is so that is a lot easier to nail down.
    How is a bathroom not at least damp? There are several rules for fixtures above tubs for example.

    So then what I am ascertaining here is that drywall, tape and mud will then make the cavity in which the NM is ran a dry location?

    However, the reference to the pipe definition is helpful and clears up the reason for the need for THHN...

    Again, thank you....


    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrobotronic View Post
    How is a bathroom not at least damp? There are several rules for fixtures above tubs for example.

    So then what I am ascertaining here is that drywall, tape and mud will then make the cavity in which the NM is ran a dry location?

    However, the reference to the pipe definition is helpful and clears up the reason for the need for THHN...

    Again, thank you....


    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    You meant THWN.
    Edward
    Education is a progressive discovery of our ignorance.


  7. #7
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    Look at the NEC definition of 'Damp Location":

    Location, Damp. Locations protected from weather and not subject to saturation with water or other liquids but subject to moderate degrees of moisture.
    If your bathroom is not protected from the weather or subject to saturation with water, then you'd better call a roofer or a plumber. If you consider steam from hot water to be 'moderate degrees of moisture', then you'll start to get science projects growing.

    Informational Note: This is sarcasm.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by edward View Post
    You meant THWN.
    Critical distinction right there. No telling how many rolls of straight THHN left that we need to watch out for. If you see something say something.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrobotronic View Post
    How is a bathroom not at least damp? There are several rules for fixtures above tubs for example.
    "Inside" the bathroom can certainly be a damp and some parts even wet locations.


    So then what I am ascertaining here is that drywall, tape and mud will then make the cavity in which the NM is ran a dry location?
    That is correct, if the interior of the wall is / was a damp location something is wrong and needs to be corrected.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrobotronic View Post
    How is a bathroom not at least damp? There are several rules for fixtures above tubs for example.

    So then what I am ascertaining here is that drywall, tape and mud will then make the cavity in which the NM is ran a dry location?

    However, the reference to the pipe definition is helpful and clears up the reason for the need for THHN...

    Again, thank you....
    In general a bathroom is a dry location with some exceptions like for lighting fixtures in the tub and shower zone. If it weren't then all receptacles and switches would require these:

    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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