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Thread: Why am I getting a shock?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electricalartist View Post
    Objectionable Current can cause this. You could have a neutral touching something grounded. Shut off the main and see if it's still happening.
    No, that cannot be the cause.

    From the OP.

    This is the,thing I'm not touching anything else really, my shoes are on and it's hardwood flooring, but all I am doing is turning the switch on or off.
    If the person is only touching an energized plate they will not get shock from line voltage sources.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    The switch is. He isn't. The charge buildup is on him. Different underwear might help.



  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    Would you get a static shock off something that is grounded?
    It's very common in the dry winters in Michigan. When the air gets so dry you hear static crackles when you take off a sweatshirt, you can really get a good static zap. A couple days ago I got one off the water faucet. The ones off the faucets and other grounded objects hurt more than the ones you get by shuffling your feet on the carpet and then lightly touching your sister's ear lobe.

    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    It's very common in the dry winters in Michigan. When the air gets so dry you hear static crackles when you take off a sweatshirt, you can really get a good static zap. A couple days ago I got one off the water faucet. The ones off the faucets and other grounded objects hurt more than the ones you get by shuffling your feet on the carpet and then lightly touching your sister's ear lobe.

    I'd certainly get a nasty belt if I tried that..............
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker View Post
    I'd certainly get a nasty belt if I tried that..............
    In my case, it was always 'turn about is fair play'.

    She has done the same thing to me more than once. What love we had for each other when we were kids!
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    In my case, it was always 'turn about is fair play'.

    She has done the same thing to me more than once. What love we had for each other when we were kids!
    I was going to ask if you still do this?

    So far it sounds like this is what the OP is experiencing, static discharge, especially if he is seeing a spark, under 600 volts from the AC supply will not jump the gap like that, but the static charge is at thousands of volts but has very low current and will only last a moment and you are then "discharged". Walking across the room may charge you enough though to have it happen again when you touch another object at a different potential.

  7. #17
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    Sounds like static to me. We get it up here when the winter air dries the house out. I like the idea of shutting the main off to test if it still does it to prove it's static.

  8. #18
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    Ugh! Two pages trying to figure out something you should have learned as a kid. STATIC ELECTRICITY. I've had the exact same thing happen to me when I touch a wall plate all the time.

    -Hal

  9. #19
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    Try new/different shoes. You are building up static electricity as you move, and any time you touch something conductive at a lower potential (which is everything when you have 10kV+ built up on you), you are discharging it. Thru the fingertips is the most painful, try discharging the static by touching a surface with the back of your hand.

    Grounding makes zero difference for static electricity discharge in the manner you describe. If you bonded yourself (dont) to the service, you would never accumulate a charge in the first place.

    If the HOs are complaining about this too, you can use plastic screws on the wallplates, tho when they touch anything metal, like a sink faucet, they would still get shocked.

    If there were a fault in the house's electrical, you would get a continued shock rather than a one-time zap from touching wallplates and the like. and the odds of numerous branch circuits failing like that is so close to zero as to be improbable.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    Try new/different shoes. You are building up static electricity as you move, and any time you touch something conductive at a lower potential (which is everything when you have 10kV+ built up on you), you are discharging it. Thru the fingertips is the most painful, try discharging the static by touching a surface with the back of your hand.

    Grounding makes zero difference for static electricity discharge in the manner you describe. If you bonded yourself (dont) to the service, you would never accumulate a charge in the first place.

    If the HOs are complaining about this too, you can use plastic screws on the wallplates, tho when they touch anything metal, like a sink faucet, they would still get shocked.

    If there were a fault in the house's electrical, you would get a continued shock rather than a one-time zap from touching wallplates and the like. and the odds of numerous branch circuits failing like that is so close to zero as to be improbable.
    Or, the HO could buy a humidifier and use it. That works every time.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

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