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Thread: 20A recep on 15A circuit?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buck Parrish View Post
    A 20 amp outlet on a 15 amp circuit and breaker is considered deceiving. If the home owner is out shopping for treadmills. They may look at the male plug (with one prong turned side ways) and say oh we have those.
    Yet, a single 20 amp receptacle seems to be allowed on a 15 amp circuit. A typical example of why we shouldn't use the code as a design manual.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    I think it is....(C) Intention. This Code is not intended as a design specification or instruction manual for untrained persons.
    Definitely, I have erred in this regard.
    So much for posting by memory.

    I find some solace, in the NECH commentary appearing to agree that the relationship is between the type of document and qualifications.
    Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    The NEC allows a 20 amp single receptacle on a 15 amp circuit. If you overload the circuit the OCPD will protect the conductors.
    I don't think it does, what code article? What I see and read on 210-21 (B)(1), it states a single receptacle installed on an individual circuit shall have an Ampere rating not less than that of the branch circuit. 20A receptacle has to be on an 20A circuit.


    Sorry disregard my post I read the article wrong.
    Last edited by lordofthisworld; 03-20-17 at 08:45 PM.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthisworld View Post
    I don't think it does, what code article? What I see and read on 210-21 (B)(1), it states a single receptacle installed on an individual circuit shall have an Ampere rating not less than that of the branch circuit. 20A receptacle has to be on an 20A circuit.


    Sorry disregard my post I read the article wrong.


    I know that this seems to go against logic but it is code complaint to have a 20 amp single receptacle on 15 amp circuit.
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buck Parrish View Post
    A 20 amp outlet on a 15 amp circuit and breaker is considered deceiving. If the home owner is out shopping for treadmills. They may look at the male plug (with one prong turned side ways) and say oh we have those.
    I'm willing to bet the average HO don't know there is a difference between a 5-20 and 6-20 receptacle until the appliance cord will not fit whatever they have.

    Why do some treadmills have a 20 amp cord cap? Do they really draw that much load? Isn't the user supposed to do most of the work and not the machine? Can a single person exert 120x20=2400 watts of energy for anything other then a very brief period of time?

    I've seen thousands of conveyors, augers, etc. that do more work then those treadmills and draw same or less VA.

    Never could figure that one out.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I'm willing to bet the average HO don't know there is a difference between a 5-20 and 6-20 receptacle until the appliance cord will not fit whatever they have.

    Why do some treadmills have a 20 amp cord cap? Do they really draw that much load? Isn't the user supposed to do most of the work and not the machine? Can a single person exert 120x20=2400 watts of energy for anything other then a very brief period of time?

    I've seen thousands of conveyors, augers, etc. that do more work then those treadmills and draw same or less VA.

    Never could figure that one out.
    Treadmills use up so much electricity because of the friction of the belt, or 'tread' against the 'floor' of the treadmill needs to be overcome.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    Treadmills use up so much electricity because of the friction of the belt, or 'tread' against the 'floor' of the treadmill needs to be overcome.
    So the 400 pound guy using the treadmill loads the thing much more then a 95 pound woman even though he is walking at 1-2 mph and she is maybe running at 8-12 mph for a good deal of her workout?

    Another thought: The "crawler" on my mini excavator is more efficient then that

    What happened to energy codes?

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    So the 400 pound guy using the treadmill loads the thing much more then a 95 pound woman even though he is walking at 1-2 mph and she is maybe running at 8-12 mph for a good deal of her workout?

    Another thought: The "crawler" on my mini excavator is more efficient then that

    What happened to energy codes?
    I am pretty sure you are correct. A Kill-a-Watt would tell for sure. Or you could just listen to the motor groan and guess.

    Treadmills are horribly inefficient. They are also dangerous.

    I see that it is more common than I thought for treadmills to have 20 amp plugs. The term used in the industry seems to be 'dedicated circuit plugs'.
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    I am pretty sure you are correct. A Kill-a-Watt would tell for sure. Or you could just listen to the motor groan and guess.

    Treadmills are horribly inefficient. They are also dangerous.

    I see that it is more common than I thought for treadmills to have 20 amp plugs. The term used in the industry seems to be 'dedicated circuit plugs'.
    Only ones I have seen with 20 amp plugs were some pretty pricey treadmills, not the relatively cheap ones you buy at Wal-Mart.

    I did some wiring for a fitness center when they first opened, all their treadmills had 20 amp cord caps. I always though of monitoring one while in use just to see what it draws. But those cost more then I would ever spend on one for use at home.

    Friend of mine once told me the doctor told him he needed to walk more. He said he can walk all day if carrying a gun

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I'm willing to bet the average HO don't know there is a difference between a 5-20 and 6-20 receptacle until the appliance cord will not fit whatever they have.
    ??? 6-20 ???

    just like many other specs, NEMA has a goofy system. the 5-20 is not a "5-20", its a 5-15/20

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