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Thread: Neutral usage for residential stove/oven

  1. #1
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    Neutral usage for residential stove/oven

    Do some of them use a temperature control that use the neutral to get Full, 1/4 and 0 output instead of on/off?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric-Light View Post
    Do some of them use a temperature control that use the neutral to get Full, 1/4 and 0 output instead of on/off?

    Yes. I will dig up schematics but I know of at least two uses of 120 to achieve temperature control:


    1. In the bake mode some ovens will apply 120 volts to the broiler element in addition to the normal 240 volts to the lower bake element during a call for heat as a means to even out the temperature within the oven (prevent the bottom from heating up faster then the top stopping uneven cooking).

    2. Some stoves have a steady "simmer" feature which applies 120 volts to the normal 240 volt stove top element.
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  3. #3
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    Here is one example off the net of the bake feature using 120 volts (sorry for the blur in advance). Follow "N" at the top coming in. It goes to terminal "N" on the dash dotted box called "selector switch" (this would be the off/bake/broil knob on the control panel). On it you also have "L1" (line 1), "PL" (oven running indicator light) "BK" (bake element) and "BR" (broil element). At the far bottom left of the diagram you have a chart showing which contacts are closed and which are open in each user selectable position. In Bake mode you have L1 to BK and L1 to PL. This provides 240 volts to the bake element and 240 volts to the pilot indicator respectively. In addition to that while in bake mode N connects to BR, which simultaneously gives 120 volts across the broiler element driving it at about 1/4 power. In broil mode however L1 connects to BR and PL, which gives 240 volts to the pilot light and 240 volts to the broiler element. Terminal BK remains open relative to all other terminals and as such the bake element does not receive any power while in broil mode.



    All 3 (bake element, broil element, and pilot light) connect to the oven thermostat which open and closes all 3 relative to L2 (line 2) to maintain the correct oven cavity temperature. In bake mode the user would set the temp knob from 150 to 500*F (as desired) and indicated on the dial. In broil mode the user would set the thermostat to the "broil" position (in addition to setting the selector switch to the "broil" mode) which sets the cutoff temp at about 550*F. In broil mode the idea is that the broil element runs as much as possible to provide radiant heat and the thermostat is just there to prevent the oven from over heating if the broiler was left on for to long or the door ended up fully closed during broiling.



    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  4. #4
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    Here is another example from a high end Kenmore range. In regards to the cook-top circuit, follow N downward. After picking up the 120 volt pilot indicator for the right rear and right front rear ceramic cook tops, it connects to the "center rear switch", through the "limiter" (high limit cut off thermostat) and to the "center rear warming element". This is often a feature offered on high end ceramic cook-top stoves where on of the main burners or a dedicated burner is capable of providing constant or near constant low level heat for simmering and keeping pot foods warm.


    In regards to the oven circuit follow N downward as well. While bake and broil are across L1 and L2 via contractors (assuming its like the few other oven control boards I have seen), the convection element and keep warm element (which I think is a separate warming drawer but not 100% as I have to double check the manual online) are across 120 volts since its an easy way of providing constant low level heat. Heck it looks like you can place a diode across the warming element

    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  5. #5
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    I believe my Kitchenaid oven uses 120 to the element in "bread proof" mode.

    It maintains a temp of about 100F for raising bread dough.


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