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Thread: Eyewash station ?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwire View Post
    Wow ... you are going on at length about clearances, illumination and such and yet tell me the example of a emergency fire sprinkler is to far off?

    The bottom line is this, the addition of a eyewash station does not change an area from a dry location to a wet location.
    Yes, I am. My argument is not based upon a wet/dry location angle, but more or less unassociated equipment being too close.

    To go with your angle tho, a sprinkler head is a one-time use item; they are never tested, whereas a shower is tested weekly. Sprinkler heads are irrelevant since they would never be tested, wouldnt be within 2' of the shower, and would never be in the way of access to the shower. Furthermore, under a fire condition, saving lives is more important than turning a previously dry location into one that is sopping wet from an activated head, and the FD may/is gonna blast it with a fire hose anyway. That is an extraordinary circumstance. Testing emergency showers weekly is NOT an extraordinary circumstance, it is (supposed to be) a weekly occurrence. Some area within the field of a shower *should*, imo, be classed as a wet location.

    Consider it like this: we have working space clearances around panels, so that we can safely access and work on them. Eyewash stations/showers *should*, imho, have the same clearances so they can be safely accessed when needed. You cannot put any obstructions between a potential source of harm and the station. In some environments, like containment pits or pump galleys, the station is stand alone since there are chemical dangers all around.

    The OP's switch at ~2' away. I keep asking if the switch is needed to illuminate the shower area because if it is, I believe that a violation of OSHA rules. Also, a nearby (< 2' away) bell box on a concrete wall containing a switch *may* be within the field of the weekly shower test spray. It could also be a "protrusion or sharp object" too close to the shower.

    Without more information from the OP (a picture would be great) re: how close the switch is to the shower, its height, etc. we will never resolve this. There may be more than one factor at play: wet/dry location, the potential safety aspect of having something too close to the shower that doesnt belong, and having to actuate other equipment in order to use the station.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    Yes, I am. My argument is not based upon a wet/dry location angle, but more or less unassociated equipment being too close.

    To go with your angle tho, a sprinkler head is a one-time use item; they are never tested, whereas a shower is tested weekly. Sprinkler heads are irrelevant since they would never be tested, wouldnt be within 2' of the shower, and would never be in the way of access to the shower. Furthermore, under a fire condition, saving lives is more important than turning a previously dry location into one that is sopping wet from an activated head, and the FD may/is gonna blast it with a fire hose anyway. That is an extraordinary circumstance. Testing emergency showers weekly is NOT an extraordinary circumstance, it is (supposed to be) a weekly occurrence. Some area within the field of a shower *should*, imo, be classed as a wet location.

    Consider it like this: we have working space clearances around panels, so that we can safely access and work on them. Eyewash stations/showers *should*, imho, have the same clearances so they can be safely accessed when needed. You cannot put any obstructions between a potential source of harm and the station. In some environments, like containment pits or pump galleys, the station is stand alone since there are chemical dangers all around.

    The OP's switch at ~2' away. I keep asking if the switch is needed to illuminate the shower area because if it is, I believe that a violation of OSHA rules. Also, a nearby (< 2' away) bell box on a concrete wall containing a switch *may* be within the field of the weekly shower test spray. It could also be a "protrusion or sharp object" too close to the shower.

    Without more information from the OP (a picture would be great) re: how close the switch is to the shower, its height, etc. we will never resolve this. There may be more than one factor at play: wet/dry location, the potential safety aspect of having something too close to the shower that doesnt belong, and having to actuate other equipment in order to use the station.
    Sure we can. The OP's question is, "Is this a wet location?" The answer is "no", as explained above by Jraef. Resolved.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Sure we can. The OP's question is, "Is this a wet location?" The answer is "no", as explained above by Jraef. Resolved.
    He also asked "Is this a violation?" of the NEC, apparently not, but that is not the only code in play here.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    He also asked "Is this a violation?" of the NEC, apparently not, but that is not the only code in play here.
    If the question regarding the light switch is in reference to wet locations, you are correct, the answer would be "no". Well, the OSHA regs don't seem to differ much from the NEC. In fact, the definitions seem to be lifted from the NEC.

    https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owa...ARDS&p_id=9976
    Last edited by gadfly56; 03-28-17 at 01:55 PM. Reason: changed conclusion

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    If the question regarding the light switch is in reference to wet locations, you are correct, the answer would be "no". As I read the OP, the NEC is, in fact, the only code in play. Lots of people have had some very interesting things to say, but the OP has his answer as far as I'm concerned.
    The op asked if the switch is a violation of 1910 (e)(2), whatever that is.
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    The op asked if the switch is a violation of 1910 (e)(2), whatever that is.
    A good point, we drifted a bit. It's essentially a copy of the NEC wording on the issue.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    The op asked if the switch is a violation of 1910 (e)(2), whatever that is.
    29 CFR 1910.305 (e) (2) is OSHA regs. The section reads:

    1910.305(e)(2)
    Switches, circuit breakers, and switchboards. Switches, circuit breakers, and switchboards installed in wet locations shall be enclosed in weatherproof enclosures.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    29 CFR 1910.305 (e) (2) is OSHA regs. The section reads:

    1910.305(e)(2)
    Switches, circuit breakers, and switchboards. Switches, circuit breakers, and switchboards installed in wet locations shall be enclosed in weatherproof enclosures.
    To compliment, here's the language from my link:

    Location --

    (1) Damp location. Partially protected locations under canopies, marquees, roofed open porches, and like locations, and interior locations subject to moderate degrees of moisture, such as some basements, some barns, and some cold-storage warehouses.

    (2) Dry location. A location not normally subject to dampness or wetness. A location classified as dry may be temporarily subject to dampness or wetness, as in the case of a building under construction.

    (3) Wet location. Installations underground or in concrete slabs or masonry in direct contact with the earth, and locations subject to saturation with water or other liquids, such as vehicle-washing areas, and locations unprotected and exposed to weather.

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