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Thread: Hot work on UPS equipment

  1. #1
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    Hot work on UPS equipment

    Hello,

    Does anyone know if hot work is permitted on UPS equipment? I was told it was once allowed by OSHA but now the code changed where it cant be done. If you can point me in the right direction that would be great.

    Thank you in advance

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bravo69 View Post
    Hello,

    Does anyone know if hot work is permitted on UPS equipment? I was told it was once allowed by OSHA but now the code changed where it cant be done. If you can point me in the right direction that would be great.

    Thank you in advance
    hot work is permitted on UPS equipment under the same conditions as any other piece of equipment. The basic rule is NO HOT WORK. There are some minor exceptions such as for debugging if it can be done safely.
    Bob

  3. #3
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    I agree with Bob above me.

  4. #4
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    https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owa...ARDS&p_id=9910

    1910.333(a)(1)

    "Deenergized parts." Live parts to which an employee may be exposed shall be deenergized before the employee works on or near them, unless the employer can demonstrate that deenergizing introduces additional or increased hazards or is infeasible due to equipment design or operational limitations. Live parts that operate at less than 50 volts to ground need not be deenergized if there will be no increased exposure to electrical burns or to explosion due to electric arcs.

    Note 1: Examples of increased or additional hazards include interruption of life support equipment, deactivation of emergency alarm systems, shutdown of hazardous location ventilation equipment, or removal of illumination for an area.


    Note 2: Examples of work that may be performed on or near energized circuit parts because of infeasibility due to equipment design or operational limitations include testing of electric circuits that can only be performed with the circuit energized and work on circuits that form an integral part of a continuous industrial process in a chemical plant that would otherwise need to be completely shut down in order to permit work on one circuit or piece of equipment.


    Note 3: Work on or near deenergized parts is covered by paragraph (b) of this section.
    Ron

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ron View Post
    https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owa...ARDS&p_id=9910

    1910.333(a)(1)

    "Deenergized parts." Live parts to which an employee may be exposed shall be deenergized before the employee works on or near them, unless the employer can demonstrate that deenergizing introduces additional or increased hazards or is infeasible due to equipment design or operational limitations. Live parts that operate at less than 50 volts to ground need not be deenergized if there will be no increased exposure to electrical burns or to explosion due to electric arcs.

    Note 1: Examples of increased or additional hazards include interruption of life support equipment, deactivation of emergency alarm systems, shutdown of hazardous location ventilation equipment, or removal of illumination for an area.


    Note 2: Examples of work that may be performed on or near energized circuit parts because of infeasibility due to equipment design or operational limitations include testing of electric circuits that can only be performed with the circuit energized and work on circuits that form an integral part of a continuous industrial process in a chemical plant that would otherwise need to be completely shut down in order to permit work on one circuit or piece of equipment.


    Note 3: Work on or near deenergized parts is covered by paragraph (b) of this section.
    Ron, has OSHA code changed in the last few years? It was brought to my attention that hot work was allowed and now revisions say its not permitted. The UPS equipment supports life safety, PLC & Network cabinets. The life safety fire alarm system would be increased hazards and therefore hot work is permitted, correct?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bravo69 View Post
    Ron, has OSHA code changed in the last few years? It was brought to my attention that hot work was allowed and now revisions say its not permitted. The UPS equipment supports life safety, PLC & Network cabinets. The life safety fire alarm system would be increased hazards and therefore hot work is permitted, correct?
    The rules have remained pretty much the same. Education and enforcment has been increasing.

    The fire alarm has its own battery back up.

  7. #7
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    Almost all the work can be done with the unit de-energized (at the last place I worked) with some control type adjustments that could only be done with the unit energized. Do you have a global wrap to completely bypass the UPS?

  8. #8
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    Yes, but often control adjustments can be done without access to high-voltage sections.

    Another disadvantage of hot work is the possibility, maybe remote, of losing the "un" off the first word .

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bravo69 View Post
    Hello,

    Does anyone know if hot work is permitted on UPS equipment? I was told it was once allowed by OSHA but now the code changed where it cant be done. If you can point me in the right direction that would be great.

    Thank you in advance
    the default is the only time working something hot is permitted,
    is when it's more hazardous to de-energize it.

    i've only had that situation once, about 35 years ago.
    a 2000 amp transfer switch in a hospital welded its contacts
    togeather due to a phase shift between shore power, and the
    genset, during weekly testing.

    all the life support in the hospital was on a genset, and couldn't
    be changed back to poco. if the genset went off, so did life support
    in the hospital, ER, OR's, etc.

    so, we put jumpers around the contacts, and removed the contact blocks and
    changed them out hot, then tested the switch with it jumpered, reset it,
    and removed the jumpers.

    so i was backup for the factory tech. we drew up a written plan, talked it thru
    a couple times, went up to unused beds on an upper floor, slept till 1 am, and
    did it then.

    35 years ago, no arc flash suits. leather gloves, kneeling on pads.
    really couldn't blanket things and still get to them.

    in todays world, it would be done a lot different.
    ~New signature under construction.~
    ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

  10. #10
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    I think the operative issue is, the rules don't change just based on the SOURCE of the electricity. So if a UPS is on an putting out power, it's hot work.

    A long time ago I witness someone get electrocuted by DC power stored in a cap bank on a large DC drive... All the switches were off, he just apparently forgot that the caps store a lot of energy (or got complacent because he had been doing it for 25+ years).
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
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