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Thread: Repurposing an 8/2 wire...

  1. #21
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    I'm not sure. I told her to call and find out so we can compare costs between that and installing a 6/3 copper.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by EEEC View Post
    I'm not sure. I told her to call and find out so we can compare costs between that and installing a 6/3 copper.
    Why Copper? Use some 6/3 or 4/3 AL. It will a heck of a lot cheaper (and quicker).
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    The chemicals to keep the spa chemistry correct cost 20x what a length of 6/2 costs (unless those were freebies too). and I dont want to know how the wiring from the disco to the tub is going to be done... sorry, but 680 installs are really not places to cut corners (not that anyplace really is, but especially not 680 installs).

    I can guarantee you a visit from a spa tech to change the panelboard to 30A will cost more than the 6/2 or even 4/2 to wire it 60A, if that's where it's set at now; maybe ask her sister what the breaker sizes are/were for the spa at her place. btw, a spa of that age may very well have cracked plumbing fittings from age and chemicals, ofc you wont find out until you fill it and run all the pumps. Just moving the spa can cause them to snap/leak/crack.

    Also, it is a good idea to go thru and check all the bonds in the pool panel to make sure they are there, tight, and not corroded. Last used spa I did had all of these problems (loose grounds, cracked fittings, set at 60A). Not saying you will but they are things to look at when installing a used spa.
    If the manufacturer's service manual says that adjusting the board is a safe option for utilizing an existing circuit, is that considered cutting corners?

    Since an 8/2 SE cable is rated at 40A, would protecting it with a 30A breaker be considered unsafe for a 680 install?

    Please understand that I'm not trying to be sarcastic; I'm having a serious conversation.... Thanks!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    Why Copper? Use some 6/3 or 4/3 AL. It will a heck of a lot cheaper (and quicker).
    I always use copper in all my installs. It easier for me to get my hands on, is a better conductor, and is more corrosion resistant (live near brackish water). The inspectors around here find it more favorable as well. It's just what i use I guess.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by EEEC View Post
    Since an 8/2 SE cable is rated at 40A
    I thought that depending on which NEC is in force, and whether the SE cable is run through thermal insulation, that the ampacity may be determined from the 75C column, i.e. 50A.

    Cheers, Wayne

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by EEEC View Post
    If the manufacturer's service manual says that adjusting the board is a safe option for utilizing an existing circuit, is that considered cutting corners?

    Since an 8/2 SE cable is rated at 40A, would protecting it with a 30A breaker be considered unsafe for a 680 install?

    Please understand that I'm not trying to be sarcastic; I'm having a serious conversation.... Thanks!
    Nothing wrong with using that SE cable at all as long as the spa needs only 240 volts and not 120/240. You could use it for anything between 15 and 40 amp circuit. As mentioned it would not be allowed connected directly to the spa, but could terminate in the spa disconnect.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by EEEC View Post
    If the manufacturer's service manual says that adjusting the board is a safe option for utilizing an existing circuit, is that considered cutting corners?

    Since an 8/2 SE cable is rated at 40A, would protecting it with a 30A breaker be considered unsafe for a 680 install?

    Please understand that I'm not trying to be sarcastic; I'm having a serious conversation.... Thanks!
    My "cutting corners" comment wasnt based on board adjustment, but that you have not stated in any way how you intend to wire from the disco to the tub. Not that you have to, but given your other questions, I wondered how you would do it, then decided I didnt want to know. I apologize, that was snarky. Please look in article 680 on how that may be done if you've any questions.

    Also, running that spa at 30A imposes some operational limitations which may not be acceptable to the customer. Your friend may not mind, but every spa install Ive done, the customer would have been blowing up my phone had I installed wiring to it be only capable of 30A.

    As for your second question, no, running (used) 8/2 SE on a 30A OCPD from the panel to the disco is not unsafe. Just saying, in my experience, it isnt worth it, for the numerous reasons I previously listed.

    Spas are a bit of a luxury item; if you can afford to buy one (get one free), and maintain it properly, you can afford to wire it properly as well. "Properly" to me is by Code, above it, not impose operational limitations by the method of wiring, and run its water chemistry correctly. None of that is free, and it's wholly unreasonable for anyone to expect you to wire one for free, even family.

    Sorry, the whole topic is a sore point as lots of spa owners spend 7k+ on a spa, 5k for the deck it sits on, then complain bitterly about a <1k electrical service to run it. Trying to hack or cobble together parts for a body of water you sit in that is connected to electrical is Darwin Award material for me, and I sleep very well at night knowing all the spa installs Ive done are either right or by someone else. Not trying to be sarcastic either, I've also seen too many public pools and private spas with egregious safety violations and substandard or non existent water chemistry. It is truly amazing to me more people arent made sick, injured, or killed thru crappy 680 installs and operations.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by EEEC View Post
    I always use copper in all my installs. It easier for me to get my hands on, is a better conductor, and is more corrosion resistant (live near brackish water). The inspectors around here find it more favorable as well. It's just what i use I guess.
    Try AL on jobs, it will save you $$$$ putting you above others. Weight for weight AL is actually many times better with conductivity. Most of what you here about AL is pure myth.
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    Try AL on jobs, it will save you $$$$ putting you above others. Weight for weight AL is actually many times better with conductivity. Most of what you here about AL is pure myth.


    I substitute AL whenever possible.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter d View Post


    I substitute AL whenever possible.
    More profit for you and less $$$$ for the customer, win-win.
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

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