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Thread: Eliminating CFL bulbs, possibly even incandescent

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Don't eat tuna fish sandwiches. A sandwich with 6 oz of tuna fish has about 48 micrograms of mercury in it. The estimated exposure (what you actually ingest) from a broken CFL is 0.07 micrograms, not the full 4 milligrams.

    I don't care for the fact that you can't seem to get 100w equivalent LED's. I like it surgery-suite bright when I'm reading or doing close work. And, I don't believe the longevity claims for LED's after my experience with CFL's. I date my CFL's on the base, and the most I've ever gotten was about 2 years. The last time I purchased lamps for the can lights in the kitchen I got incandescent PAR 38's. Still the best buy on a dollar per lumen basis.
    Yes, because elemental mercury is poorly absorbed in the GI tract unlike the mercury compounds found in fish. You could drink a cup worth of elemental mercury and not get sick. But breathing it in as it evpoarate is a whole other story, as well as the phosphorus which absorbs it.

    One time exposure from a broken bulb? Yes its certainly not the 3-5 milligrams under any stretch, but do you really want a pall point pen sized blob in your carpet giving of mercury fumes 24/7? That exposure adds up past the touted one time exposure claims.
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by peter d View Post
    That horse already left the barn a while ago, CFL is dying rapidly and all manufacturer R&D effort is 100% LED now. The CFL market is limited to lamp and ballast replacement now for existing installations, there certainly is no new CFL being installed anymore.
    I've been shopping new houses in my town. ALL of them are using CFL BR30 lamps in their recessed lighting, and in 5000k no less. Looks absolutely terrible. Residential wiring here is pure crap.




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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by brantmacga View Post
    I've been shopping new houses in my town. ALL of them are using CFL BR30 lamps in their recessed lighting, and in 5000k no less. Looks absolutely terrible. Residential wiring here is pure crap.
    I actually prefer 5000K lighting, but NOT with CFL's by any means. I love the 5000K (daylight) LED lighting. At least I can see the true color of my clothing in the morning, and will never mistake black for navy again. It's hard to tell the difference under incandescent lighting.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by brantmacga View Post
    I've been shopping new houses in my town. ALL of them are using CFL BR30 lamps in their recessed lighting, and in 5000k no less. Looks absolutely terrible. Residential wiring here is pure crap.
    My mom's house in Florida had the same thing. I took them all out and replaced them with regular incandescent ones.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by brantmacga View Post
    I've been shopping new houses in my town. ALL of them are using CFL BR30 lamps in their recessed lighting, and in 5000k no less. Looks absolutely terrible. Residential wiring here is pure crap.




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  6. #26
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    CFLs do reasonably well if left on 24/7, like hotel hallway sconce lights and lobby flood lamps. There were about 25 Panasonic CFL floods (very expensive, ~$22ea) in there when I started in 2005, 2.5 years later when I left only 1 had burned out, and they werent new when I started. ~20,000+ hour average life. Stick them in a bathroom vanity where they get cycled 30x a day, or outdoor in cold weather, and they are garbage, never warming up all the way and gypsy moth lifespans. I've only ever seen one melt, a Sylvania 60W equivalent. Those twist bulbs cannot be removed with a pole changer either unless you enjoy a glass, phosphor and mercury shower.

    Those quartz tungsten bulbs you find in older outdoor lighting, shop stand/portable lights, and some floor lamps are fire hazards that destroy the fixtures/wiring with heat very quickly. They do make nice space heater/light combos in cold weather. I dont think I've seen any of these older than about 10 years old that havent melted the high temp wire, sockets, or badly damaged the glass/gaskets. The bulbs are expensive and have terribly life expectancy. Put one in an energized luminaire and you'll be seeing lines for hours and be missing fingerprints.

    I still prefer incandescents where they will be switched a lot, but most everything else, LED all the way.

    For areas where it is legal, do grow rooms still use mainly HPS?

    Those T-5 fluorescents have great output and lower cost than LED fixtures tho the bulb flex when changing them is seriously unnerving, and broken bulbs are not uncommon.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff48356 View Post
    I actually prefer 5000K lighting, but NOT with CFL's by any means. I love the 5000K (daylight) LED lighting. At least I can see the true color of my clothing in the morning, and will never mistake black for navy again. It's hard to tell the difference under incandescent lighting.
    Your statement is actually backwards. High color temperature LED/CFL lighting might be closer to the color of daylight but their color rendering index is very bad.

    Most of the LED lighting I use is 2700 but some fixtures (UCL's, decorative) only come in 3000. I don't use anything with the CRI less than 90.
    Curt Swartz
    Electrical Contractor

  8. #28
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    I went to my local hardware store the other day looking to replace a 25W incandescent in a table lamp that had burned out. Expecting to find a small CFL I was surprised to be told that they no longer carry CFLs, only LEDs. Ok, but they didn't have anything smaller than a 40W equivalent. So I had to go with an incandescent 25W again.

    -Hal

  9. #29
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    Do they make an LED with the G2 base? Dining area fixture with CFL.
    Tom
    TBLO

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Do they make an LED with the G2 base? Dining area fixture with CFL.
    Whats a G2 base?

    Ronald

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