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Thread: Eliminating CFL bulbs, possibly even incandescent

  1. #31
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    Err ah GU24

    No wonder I couldn't find them.
    Tom
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Err ah GU24

    No wonder I couldn't find them.

    Well I googled that socket : Thanks

  3. #33
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    Eliminating CFL bulbs, possibly even incandescent

    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Err ah GU24

    No wonder I couldn't find them.
    We do mostly commercial, and almost every pendant we install uses a GU24 LED lamp...... maybe to keep people from stealing them ???? Or maybe it's easier to maintain.... less chance of a broken base and a service call.


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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by brantmacga View Post
    We do mostly commercial, and almost every pendant we install uses a GU24 LED lamp...... maybe to keep people from stealing them ???? Or maybe it's easier to maintain.... less chance of a broken base and a service call.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Know I really didn't no what they where untill I googled them.

    Must be fairly new in my 40 some years I never run across one

    Thanks

  5. #35
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    To qualify for some energy rating my house had to have a certain # or %, or some such, of the lighting be energy saving. The dinning room fixture was the easiest way to comply, IIRC.
    Tom
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    To qualify for some energy rating my house had to have a certain # or %, or some such, of the lighting be energy saving. The dinning room fixture was the easiest way to comply, IIRC.
    My city requires 50% of fixtures have energy efficient lamps, and every fixture counts as 1 no matter how many lamps in that fixture.


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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post




    3-10 milligrams is not a trace amount. In my world trace amounts would be the normal background levels of mercury found in the environment. ........
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    Don't eat tuna fish sandwiches. A sandwich with 6 oz of tuna fish has about 48 micrograms of mercury in it. The estimated exposure (what you actually ingest) from a broken CFL is 0.07 micrograms, not the full 4 milligrams.......
    The problem with the mercury in CFL's isn't so much the small amount per bulb, it is the cumulative effect of all that mercury from the billions of those CFLs installed during the past 15 years or so- all of that has to go somewhere. Most people simply throw them in the garbage w/ out a second thought.

    OTOH, we have probably reduced overall mercury emissions from coal pps b/c of these bulbs being more energy efficient, but still we have all these bulbs to get rid of- thankfully, CFLs have turned out to be transitional product and are being replaced by something better.

    Another irritation (as mbrooke pointed out) w/ CFLs is the way some have acted when they reach the EOL. There have been folks convinced that they had serious problems w/ their wiring b/c of the odor (the classic iodine-like smell that penetrates everything) and even smoking that has happened when these bulbs croak.
    Last edited by user 100; 04-08-17 at 01:15 PM. Reason: trimming quoted posts' to parts responded to

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff48356 View Post
    where LED's last indefinitely
    Wrong. The seriously biased presentation sounds like you're an LED fan boy. In general, it is true that LED activated solid state fluorescent lamps (LEDs hereafter) will replace CFLs. The biggest reason is the light from parts of CFL that emit light inwards becomes trapped and wasted.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff48356 View Post
    CFL's have a laundry list of negatives, and no advantages anymore over LED's, making them completely obsolete. These include:

    1) They contain mercury.
    Fair.
    2) They do not turn on instantly to full brightness.
    Fair.
    3) They are not dimmable. (Some are, but they cost a lot more than dimmable LED's)
    Debatable. LEDs are not sensitive to high crest factor. Dimmable LED ballsts almost alway have far more flicker content than dimmable CFL ballasts.

    4) They break easily, leaving traces of mercury around
    Plenty of LED lamps are shatterable.

    5) They still get hot, like an incandescent bulb
    As do LEDs.

    6) They burn out quickly, especially when turned on/off frequently
    Fair point. Programmed start CFLs do exist and they're the norm for external ballasts and do not suffer from short cycles like standard CFL, but it takes 1 to 1.5 seconds to turn on.

    7) They cause premature failure of neon lights built into illuminated switches.
    that is due to interaction between the lamp ballast and in-line switchwhich is used for both LEDs and CFLs.
    There are many LED lamps today that have been downspeced to just over 10,000 hrs of life which is about the same with CFL's rated life.
    Earlier LEDs strongly emphasized 50,000 or 100,000 hrs as it was impossible at the time to lower cost and had to justify initial cost with lower dollar per 10,000 claimed useful hours.
    Last edited by Electric-Light; 04-18-17 at 03:35 PM.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric-Light View Post
    Wrong. The seriously biased presentation sounds like you're an LED fan boy. In general, it is true that LED activated solid state fluorescent lamps (LEDs hereafter) will replace CFLs. The biggest reason is the light from parts of CFL that emit light inwards becomes trapped and wasted.
    Still not a major deal breaker. I know you have a passion for collecting and restoring vintage lighting, but as time goes on LED will outdo everything known today.
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    Are those glass, or plastic?
    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    Well, it looks pretty, but one reason I like the LEDs I have is that they are plastic. You can drop them on a hard floor and they don't break. I'll bet they are great for trouble lights.
    The filament tower LED lamps are filled with helium gas which is many times more thermally conductive than air. The heat is effectively spread over the entire bulb. Plastic envelope wouldn't hold the helium charge, so those have to use a traditional design that depends on rear cooled heat sink.

    These filament tower lamps use solid state fluorescent lamps made with blue LED stacks inside a phosphor tube. It would quickly burn out in ordinary air.

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