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Thread: Eliminating CFL bulbs, possibly even incandescent

  1. #1
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    Eliminating CFL bulbs, possibly even incandescent

    I'm just wondering if this year, 2017, will be the year where stores FINALLY do away with CFL bulbs in favor of LED bulbs. The prices of LED bulbs has dropped so much over the past year or two, and now a standard LED bulb is not much more than a CFL or an incandescent. LED's go for $1.97 per bulb, where incandescents go for $1.17 and have to be replaced frequently, where LED's last indefinitely. CFL prices are in between those.

    CFL's have a laundry list of negatives, and no advantages anymore over LED's, making them completely obsolete. These include:

    1) They contain mercury.
    2) They do not turn on instantly to full brightness.
    3) They are not dimmable. (Some are, but they cost a lot more than dimmable LED's)
    4) They break easily, leaving traces of mercury around
    5) They still get hot, like an incandescent bulb
    6) They burn out quickly, especially when turned on/off frequently
    7) They cause premature failure of neon lights built into illuminated switches.

  2. #2
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    Speaking from personal experience I despise, abhor and condemn CFLs. I had episodes over the decade where I gave them a chance for several different reasons (efficiency, longevity,latest trend) and soon ended up switching back to incandescent. The light is vomit regardless of the color temperature or price level, I've had two that actually burned up and smoked, the mercury is a no-no in my book considering how easily they break- sometimes automatically when they hit the end of life because the cathodes do not shut down continuing to heat the glass until it cracks when the bulb will not light. I never liked the long warm up time either. Smaller complaints for me are that in enclosed fixtures they failed much quicker, and I've had to try a several brands for outdoors because some will not light below 20*F.


    4) They break easily, leaving traces of mercury around
    3-10 milligrams is not a trace amount. In my world trace amounts would be the normal background levels of mercury found in the environment.

    Now, compare to LED. The first major LED markets were descent and I tried a few and are still running. Only down side beside the cost was the large aluminum sinks; and the light quality while light years ahead of CFL, was still not up to par in some cases to incandescent and halogen. Just recently it broke even for me. I tried a bunch of LED filament lamps last year and I have to say I was so impressed we ended up buying a 2 cases of A19s. The light is nearly identical, often indistinguishable, and I have zero complaints. I am currently replacing all of my A19s, PARs, and BR40s with LED as they burn out. To be frank I am not looking back and would not care of all general use incandescents went away.
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  3. #3
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    That horse already left the barn a while ago, CFL is dying rapidly and all manufacturer R&D effort is 100% LED now. The CFL market is limited to lamp and ballast replacement now for existing installations, there certainly is no new CFL being installed anymore.

  4. #4
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    Here is what the new LEDs look like:









    The ones that come in frosted literally look and function identical to a standard soft white A19. Only give away is that the bulb runs much cooler to the touch, other than that what LED bulb? Did I mentioned they come in a pack of 4 for about 3.99?
    What is esoteric knowledge today will be common knowledge tomorrow.

  5. #5
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    I have had some CFLs that have lasted ten years or more, and some that only lasted a few months.

    I don't buy them anymore. Only LEDs.

    I did find a bag of incandescent bulbs the other day.
    Bob

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    Here is what the new LEDs look like:









    The ones that come in frosted literally look and function identical to a standard soft white A19. Only give away is that the bulb runs much cooler to the touch, other than that what LED bulb? Did I mentioned they come in a pack of 4 for about 3.99?
    Are those glass, or plastic?
    Cheers and Stay Safe,

    Marky the Sparky

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by K8MHZ View Post
    Are those glass, or plastic?
    Glass.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    Speaking from personal experience I despise, abhor and condemn CFLs. I had episodes over the decade where I gave them a chance for several different reasons (efficiency, longevity,latest trend) and soon ended up switching back to incandescent. The light is vomit regardless of the color temperature or price level, I've had two that actually burned up and smoked, the mercury is a no-no in my book considering how easily they break- sometimes automatically when they hit the end of life because the cathodes do not shut down continuing to heat the glass until it cracks when the bulb will not light. I never liked the long warm up time either. Smaller complaints for me are that in enclosed fixtures they failed much quicker, and I've had to try a several brands for outdoors because some will not light below 20*F.




    3-10 milligrams is not a trace amount. In my world trace amounts would be the normal background levels of mercury found in the environment.

    Now, compare to LED. The first major LED markets were descent and I tried a few and are still running. Only down side beside the cost was the large aluminum sinks; and the light quality while light years ahead of CFL, was still not up to par in some cases to incandescent and halogen. Just recently it broke even for me. I tried a bunch of LED filament lamps last year and I have to say I was so impressed we ended up buying a 2 cases of A19s. The light is nearly identical, often indistinguishable, and I have zero complaints. I am currently replacing all of my A19s, PARs, and BR40s with LED as they burn out. To be frank I am not looking back and would not care of all general use incandescents went away.
    We used panel indicator lamps since Adam was a boy. In the early days these were incandescent filament lamps with different coloured lenses. An aassembly comprising several parts.
    Around 25 years ago, a customer on a fairly project, two 2.25MW VSDs (about 3,000 HP) specified LED panel indicators. These are 22mm indicators like these:



    There have been zero failures and some of the indicators are on 24/7 except for about two weeks a year when the plant is down for maintenance

    Most of my lights at home are LED. Lower running costs, light quality and longevity were the main deciding factors. The purchase price may be greater but the logevity more than offsets that.
    It's a bit of a no brainer.
    Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

  9. #9
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    I have cfl all over my house. Some have lasted more than ten years with daily use, some less, no trouble with any of them.

    I just added some led to try them out. I'm happy with them too except my dimmable leds don't dim down real low and they turn an awful grey color.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    Speaking from personal experience I despise, abhor and condemn CFLs. I had episodes over the decade where I gave them a chance for several different reasons (efficiency, longevity,latest trend) and soon ended up switching back to incandescent. The light is vomit regardless of the color temperature or price level, I've had two that actually burned up and smoked, the mercury is a no-no in my book considering how easily they break- sometimes automatically when they hit the end of life because the cathodes do not shut down continuing to heat the glass until it cracks when the bulb will not light. I never liked the long warm up time either. Smaller complaints for me are that in enclosed fixtures they failed much quicker, and I've had to try a several brands for outdoors because some will not light below 20*F.




    3-10 milligrams is not a trace amount. In my world trace amounts would be the normal background levels of mercury found in the environment.

    Now, compare to LED. The first major LED markets were descent and I tried a few and are still running. Only down side beside the cost was the large aluminum sinks; and the light quality while light years ahead of CFL, was still not up to par in some cases to incandescent and halogen. Just recently it broke even for me. I tried a bunch of LED filament lamps last year and I have to say I was so impressed we ended up buying a 2 cases of A19s. The light is nearly identical, often indistinguishable, and I have zero complaints. I am currently replacing all of my A19s, PARs, and BR40s with LED as they burn out. To be frank I am not looking back and would not care of all general use incandescents went away.
    Don't eat tuna fish sandwiches. A sandwich with 6 oz of tuna fish has about 48 micrograms of mercury in it. The estimated exposure (what you actually ingest) from a broken CFL is 0.07 micrograms, not the full 4 milligrams.

    I don't care for the fact that you can't seem to get 100w equivalent LED's. I like it surgery-suite bright when I'm reading or doing close work. And, I don't believe the longevity claims for LED's after my experience with CFL's. I date my CFL's on the base, and the most I've ever gotten was about 2 years. The last time I purchased lamps for the can lights in the kitchen I got incandescent PAR 38's. Still the best buy on a dollar per lumen basis.

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