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Thread: Items Carried On a Service Truck For Commercial and Residential.

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    19

    Items Carried On a Service Truck For Commercial and Residential.

    After reading several hundred post from many people I am a believer that Flat Rate Pricing works for Service Companies. I have seen many of Flyboys post and really enjoy reading them, as you can LEARN a lot from them. Now to my question. I have been doing a lot research locally and I have found a company that does nothing but Flat Rate Pricing and service work. As a matter of fact I swear that they took a page right from Flyboys company as they do multiple trades and invest heavily in sales training, and marketing. I also discovered that they have an agreement with one of the local supply houses to stock their Van. Can you imagine how well organized each Van is? I would like to hear what everyone else does, and see if there is a list floating around out there as to what you should really carry on your van to be successful in the commercial and residential market for service work. These guys are taught to up sell, so it's not just your typical commodities.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by lakecitieselectric View Post
    After reading several hundred post from many people I am a believer that Flat Rate Pricing works for Service Companies. I have seen many of Flyboys post and really enjoy reading them, as you can LEARN a lot from them. Now to my question. I have been doing a lot research locally and I have found a company that does nothing but Flat Rate Pricing and service work. As a matter of fact I swear that they took a page right from Flyboys company as they do multiple trades and invest heavily in sales training, and marketing. I also discovered that they have an agreement with one of the local supply houses to stock their Van. Can you imagine how well organized each Van is? I would like to hear what everyone else does, and see if there is a list floating around out there as to what you should really carry on your van to be successful in the commercial and residential market for service work. These guys are taught to up sell, so it's not just your typical commodities.

    Crickets!!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,828
    Quote Originally Posted by lakecitieselectric View Post
    Crickets!!!!
    People are out, you know, working.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    8,944
    Whatever we have on there is not the right one or we sold it this morning.
    Tom
    TBLO

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,828
    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Whatever we have on there is not the right one or we sold it this morning.
    When I was a tech doing fire extinguishers, fire alarms, and suppression systems it took me 3 years to figure out what I needed on the truck. It probably took just as long to convince my boss to stock what I needed!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NE (9.1 miles @5.07 Degrees from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    8,944
    Quote Originally Posted by gadfly56 View Post
    When I was a tech doing fire extinguishers, fire alarms, and suppression systems it took me 3 years to figure out what I needed on the truck. It probably took just as long to convince my boss to stock what I needed!
    I used to do a lot of Dryer work for farms. Small bin dryers. I finally figured out what I needed to keep on hand to be prepared each fall. I now have glass tube type time delays, an ignition transformer along with misc flame boards in stock for the last 15 to 20 years. Same ones. Genetics has make the corn dry in the fields faster and farms have gotten bigger.
    Tom
    TBLO

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    LA basin, CA
    Posts
    1,610
    1) Client tells me what they need done, I get unstocked material on the way.
    2) If they don't know, they send me pictures.
    3) If they miss something, they get it while I work, or pay my rate to run around.
    4) If junk* sits in my truck over a month, it gets returned.

    *Junk would be anything not used for device replacements, typical lighting, & power failure repairs.
    Roger Ramjet NoFixNoPay

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Simi Valley, CA
    Posts
    8,193
    I always figured that you could never have too much "I'll use it sooner or later" stuff on the truck (switches & recepts (white and tan), screws, fittings, boxes, wire, different breakers, etc). I was always big on stopping by and seeing what the "real" problem was, so if I didn't have it, I just went and got it and charged for that time.
    I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

    There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.

    John Childress
    Electrical Inspector
    IAEI / CEI / C10
    Certified Electrical Inspector

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    4,244
    When I did commercial v/d/v work, items were ordered about 5-10% over what the prints called for. 140 orange Cat6 keystones shown? Order 150. 375 1900 boxes, order 400 and 200 1" mudrings, 200 1 1/8" mudrings. Need 6500' of 3/4" ENT, order 7 1000' spools. None of it was carried on the truck, but kept in a Conex box on site.

    For residential work, I agree 100% with active1's post. You will destroy yourself having to pull off a job or send a helper to get a 30c blank white cover plate to complete a job. and there is no point in keeping 4 gang white Decora plates on the truck or 2" RPVC fittings when you might need those every 2 years. Wood, stainless steel, or gold cover plates are not normally stocked; if a customer wants a new receptacle cut in, you need to ask them in advance if they want any special coverplates. I also dont roll around with a spare panels or cases of light bulbs.

    Mostly having the right tools on the truck and having them organized is more than half the battle. Receptacles, switches, breakers (15 and 20A for most panels), GFCI receptacles, NM of all sizes, fasteners/hardware, 1/2 gang boxes, ceiling fan old work brackets, firestop, AC discos, blank and single gang plates, would be the most common used items. Having a good shop vac with a clean filter, broom/dustpan, clean tarps/drop cloths, charged batteries for the cordless tools, etc. are just as important as having the right parts for the job. Being organized is not a time sink, it's a time saver. Imho, if you cant tell a completely green helper exactly where x item is on the truck, it's not organized.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    133
    Like said already, you need to be organized and so does your van. I do a lot of service work and try to keep most stuff on my truck, your never going to have everything though. Just don't keep cases of everything, service vans don't need 50 4inch square deeps or 100 1/2 through 1inch EMT connectors. I'm lucky in my area I'm never more than 15 minutes from a supply house for the most part or the depot if need be.
    I use to keep to much stuff in my van, making it a mess and hard to find stuff. I was working in a government facility where you went over a scale going in and seeing my 8600lb gvw van coming up at 9400lbs I decided to trim it down.

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