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Thread: For those of you who are following the Tesla/Musk solar PV roof tiles

  1. #1
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    For those of you who are following the Tesla/Musk solar PV roof tiles

    Update with some nice pictures, but no hard technical information
    http://www.businessinsider.com/tesla...eatures-2017-4

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    Update with some nice pictures, but no hard technical information
    http://www.businessinsider.com/tesla...eatures-2017-4
    yeah, a lot of vaporware about this.

    i'm curious about the power output of the slate ones.
    i contacted them about their roof tiles and the power
    storage a few months ago.

    it might be worth doing it, if i could get listed as an
    installer, and see what wholesale on the tiles and
    power brick is.

    i have a feeling it's gonna be awful 'spensive.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    yeah, a lot of vaporware about this.

    i'm curious about the power output of the slate ones.
    i contacted them about their roof tiles and the power
    storage a few months ago.

    it might be worth doing it, if i could get listed as an
    installer, and see what wholesale on the tiles and
    power brick is.

    i have a feeling it's gonna be awful 'spensive.
    Might make for a nice diverse green business.
    Energy certifications to pay the bills and solar roof installation for variety.
    My fear is that they will be tied to one installation contractor, like Solar City, for example.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    Might make for a nice diverse green business.
    Energy certifications to pay the bills and solar roof installation for variety.
    My fear is that they will be tied to one installation contractor, like Solar City, for example.
    Notice how nothing about their performance or safety was even mentioned.. This is going to crash and burn. Of course they dont want to do a PPA. I would hope they Install these with their in house contractor only to save others from any liability. I need to see information on wiring, leakage currents/termination/AFCI, performance numbers and cost per watt.

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  5. #5
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    Do we know anything about how these interconnect?
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    Do we know anything about how these interconnect?
    That's what I was saying.. Hopefully someone can shed some light here because I've heard nothing even from a solar city Installer (crew lead) I know. They just know it's coming and to expect it, nothing else.

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  7. #7
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    Once they get them down to 40 cents/watt (which will be soon)...wow.

    One thousand shingles would be a 6-kilowatt system, which is about the average size. But each shingle requires a + and a – wire connector, implying 2,000 connectors for 1,000 shingles. That's too many points of failure, and too many small shingles to install manually.
    So Tesla will probably take the same approach as other companies and make a shingle assembly that has about 24 individual cells (a total of 132 watts per assembly), all of which would look like individual shingles. This shingle assembly would then have a pair of +/- wire connections and a junction box with an integrated optimizer (needed for rapid shutdown requirements). There will be a total of about 45 solar shingle assemblies.


    Now let’s look at simple paybacks for four options (assuming the ITC applies to the entire project, which may not be the case with non-solar roofing work), all of which have the same annual savings of $2,250:


  8. #8
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    A few companies have already tried and failed at this. I know Musk and his followers think he's a magician but...

    Code interpretation seems like a nightmare on rapid shutdown and wiring protection. The latter has been one of the failing points of other products.

    PVfarmer you are right that they somehow have to address the equivalent of module assembly. Not really something you want to leave to the field workers, especially if their experience is primarily as a roofer! However with some of the styles I think they're going to have issues with a 24 cell module, and with others I don't see where an optimizer as we've known them can possibly go.

    There are other fundamental issues. Having your roofing material integrated into your solar array is not a good thing, in my opinion. When one function fails you have to service both and you have to pay for someone with both sets of skills, which is someonewho barely exists right now. Tesla's products have no track record as a roofing product. And I can't really forgive Musk's snobbery about appearances. I mean, nearly nobody has a slate roof, that's a luxury item by itself. And while maybe 5 percent of solar customers care that much for aesthetics, his comments potentially increase that number and make sales a bit more difficult for conventional systems.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaggedben View Post

    There are other fundamental issues. Having your roofing material integrated into your solar array is not a good thing, in my opinion. When one function fails you have to service both and you have to pay for someone with both sets of skills, which is someonewho barely exists right now. Tesla's products have no track record as a roofing product. And I can't really forgive Musk's snobbery about appearances. I mean, nearly nobody has a slate roof, that's a luxury item by itself. And while maybe 5 percent of solar customers care that much for aesthetics, his comments potentially increase that number and make sales a bit more difficult for conventional systems.
    The very first one I know of in Southeast RI went in recently...
    And I'm gonna guess it happened because a super rich person wanted the bragging rights.

    I do know it was installed by a roofer who has an electrician employed, and not the other way 'round.

    Bottom line: For sure, $70,000 to $100,000 is a lot to spend on a roof. If Tesla's roofing tiles end up priced that high, it will be because consumers will essentially be paying for long-term electricity costs up front, according to Musk’s formula. And even if Solar Roof products cost less than our estimates, it will most certainly be initially aimed at the luxury home market.
    Natural slate may be the easiest alternative for Tesla to beat from a pricing perspective, since its expense is largely due to the fact that the material is very heavy and hard to work with. If the Tesla slate is lightweight and easy to install, it could be a cost-effective option.
    But that’s a big if.

    “Roofers aren't electricians and vice versa, so I'm most interested in seeing how the costs of labor affect the end price to consumers,” says Vikram Aggarwal, CEO of EnergySage, an online marketplace of solar installers.


    No word from Tesla on whether it will back its Solar Roof like some installers do slate—with a 100-year warranty. Or stick with a more typical 25-year warranty.
    Musk ended his announcement at Universal Studios in Los Angeles by asking: “So, why would you buy anything else?" The question was rhetorical, obviously, but the answer will have a lot to do with price.
    http://www.consumerreports.org/roofi...es-could-cost/

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldDigger View Post
    My fear is that they will be tied to one installation contractor, like Solar City, for example.
    That is in fact the main problem, as far as I can tell.
    As far as I know, normal human customers would in fact prefer another actual human being to contact them and perhaps inform them that 2 of the 4 options shown on the fancy-shmancy site are NOT in fact available yet.

    Call me old-fashioned?
    What's up with the italic part? Sounds kinda ominous.

    By clicking here, I agree that SC can contact me via automated technology and/or pre-recorded messages using the number provided. I understand that this consent is not required to make a purchase.
    http://www.solarcity.com/residential/solar-roof

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