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Thread: Article ???

  1. #1
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    Article ???

    Can't find the article that allows a 3 wire to be run to a 240vac circuit to take a 120vac off of one leg for, say, an a/c condenser to satisfy the 25' rule.
    "Appliances and wiring will burn out to protect fuses"

  2. #2
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    The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain

  3. #3
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    That's now a closed thread and I can see why I'm talking about a 20a, 240vac feeding a a/c condenser.
    To comply with a receptacle being no more than 25' from the unit, can you run a 12-3, and use one leg and the neutral to satisfy the rule? They make pull out disco's that incorporate a GFCI within the enclosure. Just wondering what section it's in.
    "Appliances and wiring will burn out to protect fuses"

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hendrix View Post
    That's now a closed thread and I can see why I'm talking about a 20a, 240vac feeding a a/c condenser.
    To comply with a receptacle being no more than 25' from the unit, can you run a 12-3, and use one leg and the neutral to satisfy the rule? They make pull out disco's that incorporate a GFCI within the enclosure. Just wondering what section it's in.
    As long as there is proper overcurrent protection on receptacle (many AC units have higher then a 20 amp breaker, even if allowed to have 12 AWG supply conductors) and the receptacle is not tied to the load side of the disconnect it is fine.

    210.63 contains the 25 foot rule you mentioned as well as the requirement the receptacle not be on load side of the disconnect.

    Otherwise multiple code sections apply, one that requires the neutral conductor to be run, one for overcurrent protection, multiwire branch circuit rules....just to name some that apply, there is no single section that only covers adding a receptacle to the AC circuit.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hendrix View Post
    They make pull out disco's that incorporate a GFCI within the enclosure.
    Like this one, that requires two circuits?
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    The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkidd View Post
    Like this one, that requires two circuits?
    Does it require two circuits if the there is a 20 amp supply circuit? You can't tap to the receptacle via the line side lug, but could use a wire nut or other device.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hendrix View Post
    That's now a closed thread and I can see why I'm talking about a 20a, 240vac feeding a a/c condenser.
    To comply with a receptacle being no more than 25' from the unit, can you run a 12-3, and use one leg and the neutral to satisfy the rule? They make pull out disco's that incorporate a GFCI within the enclosure. Just wondering what section it's in.
    I inspected an Eaton AC disconnect with a GFCI receptacle and it required a separate 120V circuit for the GFCI receptacle.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenje View Post
    I inspected an Eaton AC disconnect with a GFCI receptacle and it required a separate 120V circuit for the GFCI receptacle.
    Did it require a separate circuit or just individual conductors to land on the line side of the disconnect? Which is the general rule anyway unless the terminals are identified for multiple conductors.

    If the supply is protected by a 15 or 20 amp OCPD, NEC allows the receptacle to be on the AC circuit

  9. #9
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    210.23(A)(2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.

    Unless the unit rating is less than 10 amps, it wouldn't be permitted.
    The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkidd View Post
    210.23(A)(2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total rating of utilization equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord-and-plug connected utilization equipment not fastened in place, or both, are also supplied.

    Unless the unit rating is less than 10 amps, it wouldn't be permitted.
    I agree.
    VA Master Electrician

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