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Thread: Three Phase GFCI

  1. #1
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    Three Phase GFCI

    It seems the changes for commercial/industrial 210.8 B calls for single phase and three phase GFCI.
    Is this in any location? or just where required as always, sinks, garages, crawl space , outdoors etc.

  2. #2
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    I asked about this in another thread but got no reply. I believe everything up to 50A single phase and 100A three phase has to be GFCI. I think one would have a hard time finding a 100A three phase GFCI breaker.

    -Hal
    Last edited by hbiss; 05-18-17 at 11:50 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by wireday View Post
    It seems the changes for commercial/industrial 210.8 B calls for single phase and three phase GFCI.
    Is this in any location? or just where required as always, sinks, garages, crawl space , outdoors etc.
    Just where required, basically there's a list that includes places you have listed.
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  4. #4
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    This is new for the 2017 code right? What about the 50A/single phase and 100A/3 phase requirement? I originally was referencing a commercial kitchen.

    -Hal

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    This is new for the 2017 code right? What about the 50A/single phase and 100A/3 phase requirement? I originally was referencing a commercial kitchen.

    -Hal
    Yes it's new, yes it's required in other than dwelling units.
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  6. #6
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    The 2017 has expanded the gfci protection in the same areas as before but include all 125/250v ....

    (B) Other Than Dwelling Units. All single-phase receptacles
    rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less and three phase
    receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less,
    100 amperes or less installed in the following locations shall
    have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.
    (1) Bathrooms
    (2) Kitchens
    (3) Rooftops
    Exception: Receptacles on rooftops shall not be required to be readily
    accessible other than from the rooftop.
    (4) Outdoors
    Exception No. 1 to (3) and (4): Receptacles that are not readily accessible
    and are supplied by a branch circuit dedicated to electric snowmelting,
    deicing, or pipeline and vessel heating equipment shall be
    permitted to be installed in accordance with 426.28 or 427.22, as
    applicable.
    Exception No. 2 to (4): In industrial establishments only, where the
    conditions of maintenance and supervision ensure that only qualified
    personnel are involved, an assured equipment grounding conductor
    program as specified in 590.6(B)(3) shall be permitted for only those
    receptacle outlets used to supply equipment that would create a greater
    hazard if power is interrupted or having a design that is not compatible
    with GFCI protection.
    (5) Sinks — where receptacles are installed within 1.8 m
    (6 ft) from the top inside edge of the bowl of the sink
    Exception No. 1 to (5): In industrial laboratories, receptacles used to
    supply equipment where removal of power would introduce a greater
    hazard shall be permitted to be installed without GFCI protection.
    Exception No. 2 to (5): For receptacles located in patient bed locations
    of general care (Category 2) or critical care (Category 1) spaces of health
    care facilities other than those covered under 210.8(B)(1), GFCI protection
    shall not be required.
    (6) Indoor wet locations
    (7) Locker rooms with associated showering facilities
    (8) Garages, service bays, and similar areas other than vehicle
    exhibition halls and showrooms
    (9) Crawl spaces — at or below grade level
    (10) Unfinished portions or areas of the basement not intended
    as habitable rooms
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  7. #7
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    Thanks, that's what I understood. Problem is where would one find a 100A 3 phase GFCI breaker?

    -Hal

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    Thanks, that's what I understood. Problem is where would one find a 100A 3 phase GFCI breaker?

    -Hal
    How often does one install a hundred amp three phase receptacle?
    Once in a while you get shown the light
    In the strangest of places if you look at it right. Robert Hunter

  9. #9
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    Plenty of commercial bakery ovens are that and much more, however I would hard wire them. So the question is what is the definition of a "receptacle". (I think we had a similar discussion a little while ago.) More to the point, what difference does it make how it's connected since the GFCI is supposed to protect personnel using the equipment.

    -Hal

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    More to the point, what difference does it make how it's connected since the GFCI is supposed to protect personnel using the equipment.

    -Hal
    And at one time the problem of missing EGC pins on cord caps for NEMA 5-15 and 5-20 configurations used to be all that seemed to be of much concern, hard wire the item instead of cord and plug connect it and there wasn't near as much concern of losing the EGC. Apparently there is more concern with missing EGC on other receptacle types now, though I typically still only see it on 5-15 and 5-20.

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