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Thread: Just starting electrical design

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Longview,Texas
    Posts
    1

    No replacing field experience

    After being in the construction industry for 30 years (15 as an electrician, 10 of those 15 as a Journeyman) I had numerous back surgeries and was unable to do a lot of the work required as an electrician so I went to Kilgore College in Kilgore Texas to get my drafting and design degree. I have been at the design end for a little over a year now. First thing, There is ABSOLUTELY no replacing field experience. I can't tell you how many times I looked at a set of plans and thought "what the hell was this designer smoking when they made up this fairy tale of a design". Second, and this one surprised the heck out of me, Design is a MUCH different animal than installation but knowing how to install helps out exponentially. YouTube has hundreds of videos (even Mike Holt vids) but like was mentioned before be cautious with your video lessons. NEC is a minimum guideline and a good reference. Good Luck to ya...

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Forman View Post
    After being in the construction industry for 30 years (15 as an electrician, 10 of those 15 as a Journeyman) I had numerous back surgeries and was unable to do a lot of the work required as an electrician so I went to Kilgore College in Kilgore Texas to get my drafting and design degree. I have been at the design end for a little over a year now. First thing, There is ABSOLUTELY no replacing field experience. I can't tell you how many times I looked at a set of plans and thought "what the hell was this designer smoking when they made up this fairy tale of a design". Second, and this one surprised the heck out of me, Design is a MUCH different animal than installation but knowing how to install helps out exponentially. YouTube has hundreds of videos (even Mike Holt vids) but like was mentioned before be cautious with your video lessons. NEC is a minimum guideline and a good reference. Good Luck to ya...
    Thanks for the advice. I am also looking for classes in drafting especially in CAD and Revit too...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX, USA
    Posts
    8,450
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Forman View Post
    After being in the construction industry for 30 years (15 as an electrician, 10 of those 15 as a Journeyman) I had numerous back surgeries and was unable to do a lot of the work required as an electrician so I went to Kilgore College in Kilgore Texas to get my drafting and design degree. I have been at the design end for a little over a year now. First thing, There is ABSOLUTELY no replacing field experience.
    When I switched engineering careers from semiconductors to PV (solar) I started out installing it on residential rooftops and commercial parking shades. On my first commercial design project I was also the field supervisor while it was being built, so got to see my mistakes up close and I had to fix them. You are correct; there is no substitute for field experience.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Tampa, Fl
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by shortcircuit1 View Post
    Hello everyone,

    Over the couple of months i have been on this forum i have learned quite a bit regarding NEC and other general topics...I am going to get into design pretty soon..Do you guys have any advice as to how to learn the basic stuff regarding how to design, what needs to be kept in mind while designing a space and any books that could help me in understanding the design apart from Mikeholt NEC code?.

    Thanks in advance for answering my query..
    Lighting Photo-metrics will be one of your necessities. IESNA Handbook is the essential know all reference book. Just be prepared to fish out some $$. the new edition ( 10th) now includes LED information and can sell for upwards of $500.
    I developed an excel spread sheet for Panel boards with VA, connected loads and demand loads in a template which I import to AutoCADD. Knowledge of appliances that are cord and plug connected and there capacity in branch circuits is significant as well.
    And of course AIC ratings of your service equipment.
    Don't be reluctant to add 25% of your demand load for service size calculations for future use.

    Good Luck

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    orlando, florida, usa
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by shortcircuit1 View Post
    Hello everyone,

    Over the couple of months i have been on this forum i have learned quite a bit regarding NEC and other general topics...I am going to get into design pretty soon..Do you guys have any advice as to how to learn the basic stuff regarding how to design, what needs to be kept in mind while designing a space and any books that could help me in understanding the design apart from Mikeholt NEC code?.

    Thanks in advance for answering my query..

    Enter an apprenticeship spend 4 years and become a journeyman. Imho the best engineers/ designers started off that way.

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