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Thread: Just starting electrical design

  1. #1
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    Just starting electrical design

    Hello everyone,

    Over the couple of months i have been on this forum i have learned quite a bit regarding NEC and other general topics...I am going to get into design pretty soon..Do you guys have any advice as to how to learn the basic stuff regarding how to design, what needs to be kept in mind while designing a space and any books that could help me in understanding the design apart from Mikeholt NEC code?.

    Thanks in advance for answering my query..

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortcircuit1 View Post
    Hello everyone,

    Over the couple of months i have been on this forum i have learned quite a bit regarding NEC and other general topics...I am going to get into design pretty soon..Do you guys have any advice as to how to learn the basic stuff regarding how to design, what needs to be kept in mind while designing a space and any books that could help me in understanding the design apart from Mikeholt NEC code?.

    Thanks in advance for answering my query..
    My experience is the best designers have spent a lot of time in the field.

    1N73LL1G3NC3 15 7H3 4BILI7Y 70 4D4P7 70 CH4NG3.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by luckylerado View Post
    My experience is the best designers have spent a lot of time in the field.
    Thanks for the advice...Do you know any online courses from the universities that i can take to familiarize myself with NEC and other design aspects?

  4. #4
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    Field experience will not replace any education and education will not replace field experience.

    A good designer has to have both. I don't know how much field experience you, but if you have the chance work in the field as an electrician as long as you can (IMO minimum 4 years) so you get to experience what it takes to install. At the same time take theory and code classes and learn from others. Then switch over full time as a designer.

    Without field experience it is hard to understand and visualize the NEC when the instructor teaches a certain code section.
    Edward
    The only thing I know, is the progressive discovery of my ignorance


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by edward View Post
    Field experience will not replace any education and education will not replace field experience.

    A good designer has to have both. I don't know how much field experience you, but if you have the chance work in the field as an electrician as long as you can (IMO minimum 4 years) so you get to experience what it takes to install. At the same time take theory and code classes and learn from others. Then switch over full time as a designer.

    Without field experience it is hard to understand and visualize the NEC when the instructor teaches a certain code section.
    Thanks for the advice ed...I do have some field experience but not a lot...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortcircuit1 View Post
    Do you know any online courses from the universities that i can take to familiarize myself with NEC and other design aspects?
    The first thing to learn is that the NEC is not a design manual. The NEC is a set of minimum
    safety standards.

    You design for what is needed or wanted and then use the NEC to make sure that your design meets or exceeds these minimum safety standards.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    The first thing to learn is that the NEC is not a design manual. The NEC is a set of minimum
    safety standards.

    You design for what is needed or wanted and then use the NEC to make sure that your design meets or exceeds these minimum safety standards.
    Well said!!
    Edward
    The only thing I know, is the progressive discovery of my ignorance


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    The first thing to learn is that the NEC is not a design manual. The NEC is a set of minimum
    safety standards.

    You design for what is needed or wanted and then use the NEC to make sure that your design meets or exceeds these minimum safety standards.
    I was referring to more like any online courses that have videos of NEC rather than text so that its easier to understand..But thanks...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by shortcircuit1 View Post
    I was referring to more like any online courses that have videos of NEC rather than text so that its easier to understand..But thanks...
    lots of stuff on youtube. some of it you have to be careful about.

    i think mike holt sells some videos. he has some pretty good books I understand.
    Bob

  10. #10
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    Electrical Design

    After 40 years of installing electrical projects designed by others, I recommend the following standards.

    1. Keep your drawings neat, legible and easy to interpret.
    2. Provide separate drawings for F/A, Communications, Nurse Call Systems, A/V and etc.
    3. Provide as many elevations and details without being redundant.
    4. Communicate with MC and make clear the responsibilities for installation and equipment furnishings between MC and EC.
    5. Design and draw feeder and branch circuitry clearly on prints, indicating home run's and circuit #'s.
    6. Avoid conflicts in the scope of work. Do not bury significant information in the spec's without also noting this information on the drawings.

    There are many other items that should be followed as protocol for each project, many that have nothing to do with an electrical formulas and design.
    Hope this helps and good luck.

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