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Thread: PLT License Restrictions

  1. #11
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    BTW, I don't mean to pick on you about some of this stuff, but it seems to me that you are making an assertion that suggests the PLT guy could not replace a defective landscape light controller because it has 120V hooked up to it. That just seems incredibly absurd to me. It might be true, it might be legalistically true but routinely ignored.
    Bob

  2. #12
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    Most LV licenses that I have seen have wording that allows the holder to work on or install line voltage devices as long as the line voltage wiring has been provided by someone with the proper license to do line voltage work. It's like an HVAC guy or plumber replacing a furnace. He doesn't have to bring an electrician in to connect the wiring.

    Unfortunately I haven't been able to find the scope or restrictions of the MN LV licensing on line so I can't say for sure what it says.

    -Hal

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    Most LV licenses that I have seen have wording that allows the holder to work on or install line voltage devices as long as the line voltage wiring has been provided by someone with the proper license to do line voltage work. It's like an HVAC guy or plumber replacing a furnace. He doesn't have to bring an electrician in to connect the wiring.

    Unfortunately I haven't been able to find the scope or restrictions of the MN LV licensing on line so I can't say for sure what it says.

    -Hal
    I also checked the MN code and rules and was unable to find what it actually covers. One would think it is somewhere, but I could not find it.
    Bob

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    Where does it say this in the rules or the law that established the license? Do you have some kind of citation you can show for this assertion?

    I don't know how it is in MN but my understanding is that in most states with low voltage licenses it is about the system being worked on and not the voltages, so if there was some part of the system that was line voltage the low voltage guy could still work on it.
    Every state is different, some allow homeowners to do all their own wiring without any license at all, other states or cities are much more restrictive. Having a license is a good indication to the electrical inspectors you at least have a basic working knowledge of what your doing and hopefully don't burn your house down. If your assumption is correct than why wouldn't there be only one license for any and all electrical work?

    OSHA has a lot to say about this as well as NFPA 7O and NFPA 70E.
    Let's look at NFPA 70 National Electrical Code (NEC) Chapt 9 table 11(A) and 11(B). I think that clearly explains the limitation of class 2-3 circuits, this is what a PLT can legally work on, not class 1 circuits. In Minnesota if your working on any class 1 circuit your required to be either a licensed class "A" Journeyman or working under the direct supervision of a Journeyman regardless if any part of the system has class 2-3 wiring. Electricians are required to carry their license on them and Electrical Inspectors routinely ask workers to produce their license, if they are in violation than both the worker and contractor can be fined.

  5. #15
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    Ok. So it looks like you answered your own question.

    -Hal

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nietzj View Post
    Every state is different, some allow homeowners to do all their own wiring without any license at all, other states or cities are much more restrictive. Having a license is a good indication to the electrical inspectors you at least have a basic working knowledge of what your doing and hopefully don't burn your house down. If your assumption is correct than why wouldn't there be only one license for any and all electrical work?

    OSHA has a lot to say about this as well as NFPA 7O and NFPA 70E.
    Let's look at NFPA 70 National Electrical Code (NEC) Chapt 9 table 11(A) and 11(B). I think that clearly explains the limitation of class 2-3 circuits, this is what a PLT can legally work on, not class 1 circuits. In Minnesota if your working on any class 1 circuit your required to be either a licensed class "A" Journeyman or working under the direct supervision of a Journeyman regardless if any part of the system has class 2-3 wiring. Electricians are required to carry their license on them and Electrical Inspectors routinely ask workers to produce their license, if they are in violation than both the worker and contractor can be fined.
    If the law says a PLT guy can only work on class 2 and 3 circuits than that is the way it is. It seems to me that if the law is that clear than why are you even asking?

    Incidentally, whether the work being done is "legal" or not has no bearing at all on an employer's duty to provide a safe work environment or for an employer's liability in case of a work place injury.
    Bob

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