Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 37 of 37

Thread: Workman's Compensation

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA (19 Hrs. 22 Min. from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    5,809
    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    I can drive west from where I live all the way to the Wyoming border (about 340 miles) and never come to a city over 5k people.
    y'know, lately there is a certain appeal to that.
    ~New signature under construction.~
    ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,144
    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post
    y'know, lately there is a certain appeal to that.
    I've been to the LA area, it was a nice place to visit, don't think I want to live there though.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Atlanta,GA
    Posts
    5,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post

    dropped the customer, and cancelled the policy. that is when it got interesting.
    workers comp called and demanded an audit.

    i said i had no payroll, and there was nothing literally, to audit. no financial transactions whatsoever.
    a nasty little asian lady with bad english yelled at me about fraud, and hung up.

    never heard from them again, got a bill in the mail from workers comp for an additional $750 for
    additional premiums. this in addition to what i paid initially. a minimum charge, as it were.

    i paid it. it didn't matter. the little asian lady told the state license board i was non compliant.
    I think you made a mistake in not agreeing to the audit.

    The person that you talked to probably wasn't qualfied to take down any information and even if they were you would have been required to furnish a signed audit. By signed I mean a click of the mouse saying that all statements are true.

    It sounds like a big deal but you probably could have done the audit on-line in less than 15 minutes and saved a lot of hassels. If the audit is on paper it would still take about 15 minutes but you would need a postage stamp ( and a real signature).

    I think the reason they want an audit is that people tend to be more honest when filling out paperwork they have to sign than just talking on the phone. Plus they have a singed record of any statements made just in case there is ever a claim made against them.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    LA basin, CA
    Posts
    1,417
    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    I think you made a mistake in not agreeing to the audit.
    Here Here, village idiots teach us painful lessons, which are remembered just as long, as if we suffer the pain ourselves.
    Last edited by ramsy; 07-17-17 at 11:03 AM.
    Roger Ramjet NoFixNoPay

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA (19 Hrs. 22 Min. from Winged Horses)
    Posts
    5,809
    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    I think you made a mistake in not agreeing to the audit.

    The person that you talked to probably wasn't qualfied to take down any information and even if they were you would have been required to furnish a signed audit. By signed I mean a click of the mouse saying that all statements are true.

    It sounds like a big deal but you probably could have done the audit on-line in less than 15 minutes and saved a lot of hassels. If the audit is on paper it would still take about 15 minutes but you would need a postage stamp ( and a real signature).
    i didn't refuse the audit. agreed, that would have been a mistake.

    they required the audit be at the place of business.
    i explained there was nothing TO audit. we never made
    it to scheduling a time to view nothing that didn't occur.

    they said they would have to inspect my payroll records.
    i explained there were no payroll records, as i have never
    had employees, and never written a payroll check, and only
    had pulled the policy as it was a contractural requirement
    for one customer, and i was discontinuing the policy, as the
    customer wasn't worth the premium.

    then she said fraud was a serious crime, and hung up the phone.

    the person who talked to me was at least qualified to know how
    to file a notice of noncompliance with CSLB. i'm sure of that.
    ~New signature under construction.~
    ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Atlanta,GA
    Posts
    5,324
    Quote Originally Posted by Fulthrotl View Post

    they required the audit be at the place of business.
    i explained there was nothing TO audit. we never made
    it to scheduling a time to view nothing that didn't occur.

    I "think" what they wanted to see was your tax records for the last quarter or the last year or the time that you were covered.

    There are a lot of people that do try to cheat on workman's comp and for some big bucks.
    I knew of a commercial roofer that was working a 50 man crew with only about 20 of them listed as employees. If I remember correctly the workmans comp rate for that type of work was around 28% of payroll. It's really hard to cook the books and hide that kind of money. Either the IRS gets you at audit or workman"s comp does.

    If they get a look at your banking and tax records they get a pretty good idea if your are cooking the books.
    The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    32,144
    Quote Originally Posted by growler View Post
    I "think" what they wanted to see was your tax records for the last quarter or the last year or the time that you were covered.

    There are a lot of people that do try to cheat on workman's comp and for some big bucks.
    I knew of a commercial roofer that was working a 50 man crew with only about 20 of them listed as employees. If I remember correctly the workmans comp rate for that type of work was around 28% of payroll. It's really hard to cook the books and hide that kind of money. Either the IRS gets you at audit or workman"s comp does.

    If they get a look at your banking and tax records they get a pretty good idea if your are cooking the books.
    Then they should have asked for tax records IMO. Only way you are cheating in that regard is if you are not deducting anything you pay to any so called "employees", or maybe they find you are paying someone under a 1099 and that raises concerns over whether or not that person should be covered by a workers comp policy, even if they are otherwise a legitimate subcontractor to you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •